Reviews

Root Assassin

if you work with the ground at all, you know the importance of a good shovel. With an ordinary shovel, you have to put a lot of weight on it to even crack the ground sometimes, let alone dig a good-size hole. But with a great shovel like the Root Assassin, it feels like you’re slicing butter.

The Root Assassin shovel is one tool a metal detectorist may want to consider adding to his arsenal.

The company was kind enough to send us their digger to review. Here’s what we think:​

Why Is the Root Assassin Good for Detectorists?

As metal detectorists, we’re sunk if we don’t have a great shovel by our side.

Without the right shovel, you’ll never be able to dig deep enough in tough ground to reach our targets, especially if there are tree roots or gravel involved.

And if we can’t dig deep enough, it doesn’t matter that we’ve found great targets — we’ll never be able to unearth them.

Plus, if you fatigue yourself just by digging a few targets, you’re not going to detect as long as you would if you weren’t tired.

The more time you spend out there detecting, the better your odds of making that once-in-a-lifetime discovery. And isn’t that what every detectorist dreams about?

The Root Assassin is a heavy-duty shovel made for tough roots. That’s important for detectorists, especially if they like to search by big, old trees.

I’ve had great success looking by old trees that I imagine were used as shade back in the day by people looking for a place to escape the summer heat.

I’ve found jewelry, coins, gold-plated lift-arm lighters and a lot of old toy cars, ships and helicopters by shade trees. And let me tell you, it wasn’t easy.

I was in a battle with a lot of thick, tough roots that were protecting all the signals I was trying to reach.

The only thing that saved me was using a shovel with serrated teeth.

When there are roots involved, shovels with serrated teeth, like the Root Assassin, will help you recover targets quickly and with less effort than a traditional shovel.

Features

The best feature on this shovel is the 16 serrated teeth that are found on each side.

Here is what is unique about these teeth — they cut while digging in and when you pull your shovel out.

That double action makes quick work of the root you’re trying to cut and get out of your way.

The teeth also help when you’re searching in heavy clay soil that is a pain to dig with a traditional shovel.

The other great thing about this shovel is how easy it is to lift and carry around with you.

It only weighs 4 pounds.

As a detectorist, you’re going to be lugging around a lot of equipment already, especially if you’re doing a day-long hunt in a remote area.

You’ll already be carrying your detector, a pinpointer, your treasure bag, plus any water, food, bug spray and sunblock you take with you on an extended hunt.

The last thing you need is a heavy shovel to take with you.

Because this shovel doesn’t weigh much, you’ll be able to take it with you and use it for hours without feeling exhausted and calling it a day early.

It cuts a neat plug, which is crucial as a detectorist.

Whether you’re hunting at a public place like a park or you’ve been granted special permission to detect on private property, you don’t want to earn a reputation as a detectorist who tears up the property he searches.

If you don’t learn how to cut a neat plug, word will spread and fewer people will be willing to let you search their grounds.

The Root Assassin is made of steel which is then treated with a silver powder coat paint.

Since it’s made of strong material, it should be durable. If you do have any issues with the durability, however, the company offers a 100 percent replacement guarantee.

The guarantee lasts for one year and will be honored with no questions asked.

This shovel has a grip on the handle, which makes it comfortable to use and easier on the hands.

Because the head of this shovel is so narrow, you won’t have to cut a huge plug to reach a small target.

If you are good at pinpointing your target, you’ll be able to cut a small plug once you’ve zeroed in on where the signal is coming from.

The length of the blade on this shovel is good for metal detecting.

You’ll be able to cut plugs at up to a foot at a time, which is as deep as most smaller targets are found from the large majority of amateur metal detectors.

The Mini Root Assassin

If a full-size, 4-pound shovel is still too much weight for you to lug around, you may want to consider using the Mini Root Assassin.

Check latest pricing here for the mini version.​

It works using the same method as the full-size shovel, with the serrated teeth that work in both directions.

But the Mini Root Assassin is a lighter, shorter option at 2.2 pounds.

If you don’t have much upper body strength or you want to conserve your energy for longer detecting sessions, you might want to go with the Mini.

It’s also a good pick for shorter detectorists who have problems wielding a longer shovel.

And it goes without saying that a smaller digging tool is always preferred when hunting in public areas or small residential yards. See our responsible metal detecting guide here.​

Wrapping Up

In addition to your metal detector, a good shovel is a key part of your success as a detectorist.

You’ll need to find a heavy-duty option that is light enough that you’ll be able to hunt day after day with minimal soreness in your arms and back.

No matter which shovel you decided to go with, remember to always fill in your plugs and be a responsible detectorist.

The kinder we are to the ground we search, the more rights we’ll keep as detectorists.

 

Review source: https://www.smarterhobby.com/metal-detecting/root-assassin-shovel-review/
Author name: Mark Orwig

 

 

 

With a fearsome name and an appearance to match, it’s easy to see why the Root Assassin Shovel is catching the eye of many gardeners. A unique take on the traditional shovel, the Root Assassin is a double-edged serrated shovel with a sharp point that claims to make short work of even the toughest root systems.

Using such a unique design helps the Root Assassin be a very versatile shovel that will make life much easier for a range of gardening tasks. Of course, many gardening products claim to be revolutionary despite being nothing special, which begs the question – is the Root Assassin Shovel worth buying?

Let’s take a closer look and see!

Overview:

 

  • Weighs only 4lb
    • 20 Serrated Blades on Each Side of the Shovel
      • Carbon Steel Blade
      • Reinforced D-Grip Handle
  • Golden Shovels Award Winner
  • 100% Money Back Guarantee For 1 Year

 

 

 

 

Digging

Any shovel that struggles to dig soil and turf won’t be worth much to most gardeners, so it’s great to see how effective the Root Assassin is when it comes to digging.

It slices through turf and other soft materials with incredible ease. Should you want to dig up a hole in your lawn for a shrub, tree, or flower bed, then the Root Assassin will make short work of pretty much everything it digs into!

This makes it especially great at digging up trenches, although the fine point does mean it’s not the best for lawn edging. However, the Root Assassin really comes into its own when digging in tougher soil rich with clay and stones.

Thanks to the serrated edges, the Root Assassin is so much better at digging through tough material than any other shovel on the market. So, if you have a lot of digging to do in rugged terrain, this is certainly the shovel you want for the job!

Dealing with Roots

digging roots with shovel

As the name suggests, the Root Assassin is highly effective at digging through roots. There are plenty of shrubs and bushes that produce very thick, deep roots that are a nightmare to deal with when trying to transport or remove the plant.

The Root Assassin makes short work of these!

Simply sink the shovel into the soil and dig away, and when you come across any type of root you only need to saw at it for a moment and the roots will be easily severed from the plant. They certainly picked an appropriate name for the Root Assassin!

Pruning

The Root Assassin doesn’t just remove roots, as the serrated blade doubles as a handy pruner. The blade is sharp enough to saw through most branches without much issue, although manoeuvring the shovel like a saw does take some getting used to.

While pruning shears are still recommended for thicker branches, the Root Assassin is still a fine alternative – especially if you can’t be bothered grabbing another tool from the shed! Also, the impressive length (4”) of the Root Assassin makes it ideal for pruning hard to reach spots without having to use a ladder!

Usability

The Root Assassin should be easy enough for most gardeners to use, although it’s worth noting that it is rather tall at 4”. Granted around a quarter of that height is the serrated steel blade, but those that are shorter may have some issues when first using the shovel.

The Root Assassin weighs a modest 4lbs, so using it shouldn’t feel too strenuous, while the reinforced D-grip handle offers enough space to use comfortably.

All in all, the Root Assassin is a fantastic shovel well worth investing in! For those with tough digging and lots of deep roots to deal with in their garden, there aren’t many better tools to make your life easier than the Root Assassin!

Review source: http://www.lawnmowerhut.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

Move over Jason Bourne. There’s a new assassin in town. And we’re still after the bad guys. Except this time, we’re dealing with weeds, roots, and branches. It’s called the Root Assassin and it’s ready to tackle those weeds, dig up deep roots and slash that branch. You’ll love this slender, rigid tool with serrated teeth for tons of tasks. I have lots of yard to do this fall and like different tools for various jobs. It all depends. But what makes the Root Assassin completely unique? It’s the shovel/saw combo. Never seen the like of it before! It has never occurred to me to use a shovel to saw with. Until now. So I’m thrilled that there are two winners who will get their very own Root Assassin valued at $55. To enter, like the Raise Your Garden Facebook page andshare this post or sign up for our newsletter. For two entries, do both. Let us know you entered by telling us something fun about yourself in the comment section of this post!

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First impressions of the Root Assassin

So there are times my brain tells me it’s okay to nag Tom to do tasks that I really, really don’t want to do. This is especially true when it comes to yard work that requires any upper body strength as I have zero. I’m just not very big. To give Tom credit, he’d help me in my perennial beds, but I’ve declined his help because he doesn’t know where my plants are. He just hacks at everything. Loosing perennials in this way is sad. I still miss my Japanese iris.

And I think I told you we bought my Grandma’s house several years ago? And with it, I inherited her perennial beds with plants. The problem is, over the years of neglect, they got overgrown. Unmanageable. Trees got embedded in there. Shrubs got overgrown. Thick brush took over. Weeds became so strong that they uprooted all else in their path.

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Enter: Root Assassin Shovel. Just now I was working until dark hammering away at a few super roots that had taken over my side perennial bed. For years, they remained there because no ordinary shovel that I could maneuver would be up for the task. Bu-bye roots. I actually got them out myself without Tom’s help. It was pretty easy. Those serrated teeth really hacked away. I just have to double check that I got all of the root out so it doesn’t come back stronger than ever. But that’s a success story!

But be careful! This tool is super sharp which is why it is able to chop branches. But that was my next task. Would it easily slice through a branch? That was the test the Root Assassin would have to pass. Quick answer. Yep. It worked. I hardly knew what to expect. I mean, one hardly expects a shovel to be a saw.

And that’s what so great about the Root Assassin Shovel. The typical saw doesn’t have a handle on it. I always fear that I’m going to saw my fingers off! The long handle gives you some distance from the object you are sawing. The red grippy handle also gives you something to grasp with force.

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Product rundown

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Industrial grade 14-gauge blade
  • Made of solid structural carbon steel and is overlaid with a sleek silver color powder coat
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip for added leverage and control
  • Red handle means you can find when you left it in the garden before the rain comes
  • Steel shaft is topped with durable solid rubber coated bright red handle
  • Weighs 4 pounds

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Ways to use this tool – Think outside the box

  • Trim and prune plants and trees
  • Cut branches still on the tree or on the ground
  • Dig out deep, deep roots – super roots I call them!
  • Edge your lawn
  • Dealing with thick brush
  • Transplant your “big plants” like shrubs or gigantic hostas
  • Landscaping
  • Metal Detecting tool
  • Plant your bulbs deep so the squirrels don’t eat them
  • Take with you on your next camping trip
  • Saw off your Brussel Sprouts from the plant. It worked great for this odd purpose!
  • Terrify intruders to your home. I mean, this tool is fierce. Those serrated teeth will surely scare the bad people away. Just keep under your bed at night. (I’m not kidding!)

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Last thoughts….

It was great hearing Tom shout out the other day “where’s the Root Assassin?” This means he’s going to get a job done. And a dirty shovel is one that is being used! It was intriguing that I found myself sawing away at branches, not because that was a chore that needed to get done, but rather for the fun of it. Just because I can!

And yes, I’ve endorsed other shovels on this site, but certainly not one that can slice through thick, woody branches. That’s just fierce. So it’s about having the right tool for the job. Each has a place. It’s kind of like when you sit down to dinner and you choose between using a fork or a spoon. Some choices are easy. Soup = spoon. Spaghetti = fork. But what about a thick pot roast with a gravy? You might choose both. It’s the same with with shovels and spades. At times you choose one over the over, other times, you’ll use both on the job.

 

Review source: http://www.raiseyourgarden.com/home/saw-away-with-the-root-assassin-shovel-two-winner-giveaway

Well built sturdy shovel that performed well.

In my original review I listed a con as the price. Recently I was looking at some garden spades and was surprised to see the price of these. Considering the Root Assassin is built much better than any spade I could find, the price really isn’t bad.

The Root Assassin Shovel lived up to its name in a trial in my vegetable garden. Preparing my raised beds for spring planting was easily accomplished as the Root Assassin cut through roots left by last year’s crop, cover crops and invading tree roots.

Roots up to 1 inch or more were so easily cut I barely noticed they were there.

On one raised bed all I did was turn the soil to a depth of about 1 1/2 shovel lengths. After raking the bed smoothed I just hand picked the root pieces that were left on top.

For the second raised bed I dug out some of the soil and sifted it. The Root Assasin did will in the actual digging but it may not have been as good as a standard shovel had my (sandy) soil been very dry.

Just to put the Root Assassin through some of its paces I tried digging a small hole near a tree stump.

The Root Assassin cut through the smaller roots with ease. When I hit the 2″-4″ root it took a little practice to get the shovel to cut. It didn’t take me long to learn and the root was cut within minutes.

One thing though, do not expect to get a straight cut. At least not for me.

My centipede grass has grown well onto my sidewalks as we were not living in the home for about 9 months and the maintenance was let go. I tested the Root Assassin Shovel on edging along my side walk. It cut through the thick mat of grass and roots with no effort. I’ll be finishing this chore at a later time but I will follow up using a week trimmer since the slight  curve of the blade on the Root Assassin does not make a neat straight line.

I did not attemtp to trim any tree branches with the Root Assassin Shovel and don’t think this would be my tool of choice for the chore.

Pros:

  • Strong
  • Well built
  • Cuts roots and grass easily

Cons:

Price – The price plus shipping are little high but product is still worth it if you’ve got root and grass problems.

Recommendations:

I would definetly recommend the Root Assassin Shovel.

 

Review Source: http://thegardenswap.com/rootassassinreview.aspx/
Author name: Wayne Schaefer

Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel

As I sit down to write this, I am pondering two possible titles, “Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel” or “My New Favorite Shovel.” Hmmm. When the folks from the Root Assassin sent me a shovel to test for this review I was initially skeptical. It is kind of a crazy looking thing!  Almost like an alligator, chainsaw, and shovel had a baby.

 

I was waiting for the perfect project to give the Root Assassin a project it deserved. I mean you can’t use something called the Root Assassin to plant pansies!  We are working on a major yard renovation and I knew this would be the perfect opportunity. My dad came to town and we were cutting down trees, removing palms and getting busy on our projects. We removed a 25′ tall viburnum from the corner of the shed and this gave us two opportunities to test out the Root Assassin.

The first project was for digging and transplanting this large bromeliad. As you can see, the roots of the viburnum were intertwined with the bromeliad, yet we wanted to try to keep as large of a root ball as possible. We tied up the plant (the serrated edges of the bromeliad will really tear into your legs!), and I started working my way around with the Root Assassin. It was a breeze. The upper edges of the shovel have a reinforced edge to use your foot for extra push and it took less that three minutes to pop this plant out of the ground.

 

Once the viburnum was cut down it left our shed extremely visible and in need of a little more cover. I’ve been plant lusting for a Japanese Fern Tree, Filicium decipiens, for a few years but didn’t have anywhere to plant it until now. But of course I wanted to plant it approximately one foot from the trunk of the previous viburnums. If this was a small plant it may not have been much of an issue, but this plant was in a 30 gallon container almost  30″ in diameter and needed a large hole.

This is where the Root Assassin really shines. Using the shovel in a sawing motion takes some getting used to, but it very quickly cuts through large roots in the ground.  I think I could have been at this project for a long time if I hadn’t been using this shovel. I used the Root Assassin to cut large roots, some up to 2″ in diameter, and clear the hole without too much of a problem. In fact, because March Madness was on tv, I actually did this during halftime of the Iowa basketball game!

Overall the shovel is very light and just the right length for using the handle for leverage and also getting in tight areas. I have a bad habit of kind of using my shovels like crowbars to pry out plants and while my other shovels creak and grown (and will surely snap one day) the Root Assassin stood strong. And while this might sound like a trivial point, the red handle makes it easy to find too!

Root Assassin Shovel

 

 

If I have any criticism of the Root Assassin shovel it would be that I am a little afraid I will cut through an irrigation pipe with it!  My regular shovels won’t hurt these pipes, but when I get into the sawing motion with the Root Assassin I have a feeling I could cut through some pvc without even realizing it. I do take some care when I know I am near these pipes and haven’t had any issues yet.

Our next trial for the Root Assassin was to dig a large hole through established perennial peanut groundcover. By this point my dad and I were arguing over who got to use the Root Assassin and who had to use the “regular” shovel.   In my dad’s words, “Boy, that shovel really cuts through.”  Who would have thought he would be a converted fan too?

If you’ve ever tried to plant anything in an established bed of perennial peanut you probably found that the hardest part is cutting through the tough, wiry stems and roots. The Root Assassin did a great job for this task. We used the Root Assassin in a sawing motion to dig the perimeter and then remove the roots. Once that was cleared it was easier to use a regular spade to remove the sandy soil and dig to the depth for the new palm.

 

As our yard renovations continue it is a constant argument over which one of us gets to use the Root Assassin. If you are constantly battling roots and tough digging conditions I would recommend the Root Assassin. As the name so boldly states, it will tear through the toughest of soils and roots to make digging, transplanting or any garden work a pleasure. You can find more information on the Root Assassin through their website.

While I did receive a complimentary Root Assassin Shovel, the opinions provided here are my own. And yes, I would purchase one again.

 

Review source: http://misssmartyplants.com/root-assassin/
Author name: Keri Byrum

 

Review: I currently own several shovels, one for all purpose digging, and one for spading earth. Both work fine, and have held up for years to the basic needs of my gardening tasks.


deep into the clay. It also did great at digging up the rocks, based mostly on the more triangular shape of the blade. The blade is 2” wide at the digging end, 16 ½” long, and 6” wide at the top, with slight edges on top for to leverage with your foot when digging.

When it came to chopping up larger clods of soil, just turn it on it’s side and use the serrated edges. It made light work of this step.

This shovel only weighs 4 lbs, so was easy for me to use. I’m only 5’ 2”, so thought it might be a bit tall for me, but I really didn’t have any issues with the length, especially after inserting into the ground. I also love that it’s all metal with a heavy plastic handle, and easy to hose off when I was done with it.


This is honestly my new favorite shovel. I’m super happy with it, and highly recommend you give it a try in your own garden. I think it will become one of your “go to” tools! think it will become one of your “go to” tools!

 

Review Source: http://gardenbunch.com/product-reviews/root-assassin-shovel-and-saw/
Review by ChristineGB

Is your dream of an outdoor sanctuary hindered by dense, scrubby bushes and weeds? Does the thought of backbreaking digging prevent you from transforming your overgrown jungle into a relaxing haven?

Then look no further than the Root Assassin Shovel!root assassin shovel

Large holes and strong roots are no match for this extreme spade, meaning you can clear the undergrowth in no time without any hard labor.

It was a friend who first introduced me to the wonders of the Root Assassin. Having just moved into a new house, life was hectic and I simply didn’t have the time to spend tidying the neglected wilderness of my back garden. Desperate for a quick fix, I called a few landscaping companies but was shocked by the extortionate prices quoted to me. I was moaning about the predicament to my green fingered friend when she suggested I borrow her Root Assassin.

Initially, I was a little skeptical. The Root Assassin sounded like it would be more at home in a Tarantino movie than a garden. The serrated teeth added to its fearsome image, giving it the appearance of a halved shark’s head. It certainly looked fierce, but would it really make my garden woes a thing of the past?

The first thing I tackled was a large untamed Burning Bush that was swamping a large chunk of my yard. Anyone familiar with these hardy shrubs will know that the intense root system makes them a nightmare to remove. Not with the Root Assassin though. The unique structure of the toothed edge swiftly chomped its way through the roots.

Impressed and spurred on by my success, I moved on to the large section of privet hedge that fenced off an old vegetable patch. Again, no contest. The Root Assassin slid into the earth and sliced through the roots with one easy push. No straining or sweating involved.

I soldiered on and managed to clear the whole garden in one enjoyable afternoon. It was an absolute breeze! I went out the next day and bought a Root Assassin shovel for myself, knowing it would come in handy for future projects. And I haven’t been disappointed. I excavated a 14-foot-long trench to make a raised flower bed with minimal hassle, and when I realised what a cinch it was, I went ahead and dug out the foundation for a 12×6 foot patio too.

At just 4lbs, the shovel is so lightweight that it’s a pleasure to work with, and the carbon steel frame guarantees that it will withstand the elements. Along with removing unwanted shrubs and digging out earth, I have also used my Root Assassin to saw off stray branches on my birch tree without difficulty. The long handle gives access to higher limbs without the need for a ladder. Sawing with the shovel will dull the serrated teeth over time, but they can be sharpened using a wheel or grinder.

It’s almost a month since I bought my Root Assassin shovel, and it has rapidly become my favourite tool for a multitude of garden tasks. Saving time, effort and money across the board, it really is the jack of all spades!

One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Nevertheless, I was skeptical. All my life I’ve gardened in dense clay soil, and my current garden is on a rocky ridge where I deal with both clay and stones. I doubted even this aggressive-looking shovel would be up to the challenging task.

pruning branches with Root Assassin

While slightly cumbersome to wield, the shovel did indeed saw through branches, even thick ones.

The video on the company’s website shows the shovel being used as a saw to cut through limbs as well as delving in the ground, cutting effortlessly through turf, and slicing through pesky roots with a single swipe. Again, I was skeptical. Would this shovel really work in the real world? Is this truly “Super Shovel,” coming to the rescue of gardeners who battle with roots and rocks and difficult soil? Can it do all that and prune branches?

Pruning Branches

penetrating turf with Root Assassin shovel

I casually stuck the blade into the grass to stand it up, and was surprised how easily it sunk deeply into the turf – deeper than shown in this photograph.

First I tried it as a saw to prune branches. While it was a little awkward to use a shovel to cut through wood, and it wasn’t as efficient as a bow saw, it worked. If you’re digging in the garden with your Root Assassin shovel and see a branch that needs trimming, you can deal with it right away, saving yourself a hike to the tool shed or garage to get another tool.

Penetrating Turf

digging thru roots with Root Assassin shovel

When you encounter a root, continue to dig and pull up against the intruding fibers. The shovel sliced through them with ease, making digging easy.

It was startling how easily The Root Assassin cut through turf, slicing through the thick mass of roots like a hot knife through soft butter. Clearly this is the tool you want if you’re planting in grass. The pointed tip, designed to penetrate through tough soil, would allow you to cut the perfect diameter holes for planting bulbs such as crocus or spring star flowers (Ipheon) in the lawn, and digging holes for trees or shrubs would be a snap.

Unfortunately, the pointed tip and slight curve of the blade makes the shovel unsuitable for edging, as it would be very difficult to cut a straight, sharp line. On the flip side, this is a superb tool for cutting deep and narrow trenches, so while the Root Assassin shovel can successfully multitask, it cannot – and should not be expected to – do everything.

Digging and Cutting Through Roots

long Root Assassin shovel

It would have been a little easier for me to dig with the Root Assassin if I were taller.

The Root Assassin also lived up to its claim as a root eater. We tackled a dead shrub that needed removing, so it didn’t take long to encounter roots of significant girth. A little sawing accompanied by continued digging, and each root was easily severed. The shovel worked like a charm, making a potentially challenging job much, much easier.

Ease of Use

handle on Root Assassin shovel

The padded handle is easy to grip and comfortable.

The solid steel shovel stands 4 feet tall. The narrow, commercial grade 14-gauge steel pointed blade represents at least 12” of that length. At 5’3” tall, I found getting my foot firmly on the step in a position where I could put my weight and strength onto the blade for digging was a bit like climbing onto stilts. However, my 6”4” tall husband had no problem whatsoever. It would be nice if the shovel came in different sizes: large, medium and small – or tall, mid-height, and short.

The handgrip is comfortably wide, accommodating large or small hands, and is made of reinforced rubber that is both durable and slip-proof.

foot step on Root Assassin shovel

The manufacturers claim the step is angled, but I didn’t notice that. However, I’m sure it didn’t matter one way or the other.

The manufacturers claim the step is forward turned for secure foot placement, but I couldn’t see it. To my eye it looked almost perfectly parallel to the ground if the shovel is held straight upright.

Specifications and Features

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Commercial grade carbon steel 14-gauge blade
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip, reinforced rubber handle for added leverage and control
  • Weighs 4 pounds
  • Retails for $59.99

Recommendation

5 Shovels Rating from Gardening Products ReviewOften hybrid tools end up doing neither job well. The Root Assassin is a happy exception. If you are digging a hole in a root-infested area, this is the perfect tool. While I would not pick up this tool simply to cut off a branch, if it’s in my hand when a branch for cutting presents itself, it will do the job effectively.

The Root Assassin Shovel lives up to its name, and to the claims made by the manufacturer. I highly recommend it.

The company can be reached online through their website www.Rootassassinshovel.com. The Root Assassin is a patented all-purpose garden shovel and saw.

Where to Buy

The Root Assassin shovel is available directly from the manufacturer or through Amazon. The retail price is $59.99 at either location, plus shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

At the end of each year, the Gardening Products Review takes a close look at all of the products we’ve reviewed that year. We then award up to five products with the Golden Shovel Award for outstanding garden product.

In 2014, we had a lot a fabulous products to choose from, including some new introductions, as well as some that have been around the block a few times. Our reviewers weighed in with their favorites and we also heard from many of our readers. We revisited some of the products that we reviewed earlier in the year, checked how well products were holding up after extended use, and looked at which items got the most use from our testers and home gardeners.

After weighing the pros and cons of all of the gardening products, we’re proud to announce the 2014 winners of the Golden Shovel Awards!

2014 Golden Shovel Award Winners – Editor’s Choice

 

Review of Bear Wallow rose gauntlet glovesBear Wallow Gloves Rose Gauntlets – At first glance, these gauntlet-style gloves look like a pair of regular leather gardening gloves with a sleeve sewn on. Kind of a home-made look (which makes sense – they’re hand-made right here in the USA). But don’t let that fool you – these are hands down the absolute best pair of gardening gloves I’ve ever used for pruning roses..

 

HERShovel-featuredHERShovel Ergonomic Shovel for Women – HERS® is a hybrid tool that combines the features of both shovel and spade, designed with women’s bodies, height, and digging style in mind. Women will find that it offers lighter weight, improved leverage, and larger capacity than most shovels.

 

 

Root Assassin shovel reviewRoot Assassin Shovel – One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Often hybrid tools end up doing neither job well but this easy-to-use shovel not only cuts easily through root-infested soil, it also prunes branches and sinks into turf easily.

 

 

Spear Head Spade reviewSpear Head Spade – This precision digging tool combines some of the best characteristics of a spade with a garden axe or knife. Lightweight yet sturdy, it makes quick work of a wide range of garden tasks. It is a great addition to the tool shed—but not a replacement for other shovels. What it does, it does much, much better than less specialized digging tools.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/2014-golden-shovel-awards-best-gardening-product/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

+ Smarter Hobby

if you work with the ground at all, you know the importance of a good shovel. With an ordinary shovel, you have to put a lot of weight on it to even crack the ground sometimes, let alone dig a good-size hole. But with a great shovel like the Root Assassin, it feels like you’re slicing butter.

The Root Assassin shovel is one tool a metal detectorist may want to consider adding to his arsenal.

The company was kind enough to send us their digger to review. Here’s what we think:​

Why Is the Root Assassin Good for Detectorists?

As metal detectorists, we’re sunk if we don’t have a great shovel by our side.

Without the right shovel, you’ll never be able to dig deep enough in tough ground to reach our targets, especially if there are tree roots or gravel involved.

And if we can’t dig deep enough, it doesn’t matter that we’ve found great targets — we’ll never be able to unearth them.

Plus, if you fatigue yourself just by digging a few targets, you’re not going to detect as long as you would if you weren’t tired.

The more time you spend out there detecting, the better your odds of making that once-in-a-lifetime discovery. And isn’t that what every detectorist dreams about?

The Root Assassin is a heavy-duty shovel made for tough roots. That’s important for detectorists, especially if they like to search by big, old trees.

I’ve had great success looking by old trees that I imagine were used as shade back in the day by people looking for a place to escape the summer heat.

I’ve found jewelry, coins, gold-plated lift-arm lighters and a lot of old toy cars, ships and helicopters by shade trees. And let me tell you, it wasn’t easy.

I was in a battle with a lot of thick, tough roots that were protecting all the signals I was trying to reach.

The only thing that saved me was using a shovel with serrated teeth.

When there are roots involved, shovels with serrated teeth, like the Root Assassin, will help you recover targets quickly and with less effort than a traditional shovel.

Features

The best feature on this shovel is the 16 serrated teeth that are found on each side.

Here is what is unique about these teeth — they cut while digging in and when you pull your shovel out.

That double action makes quick work of the root you’re trying to cut and get out of your way.

The teeth also help when you’re searching in heavy clay soil that is a pain to dig with a traditional shovel.

The other great thing about this shovel is how easy it is to lift and carry around with you.

It only weighs 4 pounds.

As a detectorist, you’re going to be lugging around a lot of equipment already, especially if you’re doing a day-long hunt in a remote area.

You’ll already be carrying your detector, a pinpointer, your treasure bag, plus any water, food, bug spray and sunblock you take with you on an extended hunt.

The last thing you need is a heavy shovel to take with you.

Because this shovel doesn’t weigh much, you’ll be able to take it with you and use it for hours without feeling exhausted and calling it a day early.

It cuts a neat plug, which is crucial as a detectorist.

Whether you’re hunting at a public place like a park or you’ve been granted special permission to detect on private property, you don’t want to earn a reputation as a detectorist who tears up the property he searches.

If you don’t learn how to cut a neat plug, word will spread and fewer people will be willing to let you search their grounds.

The Root Assassin is made of steel which is then treated with a silver powder coat paint.

Since it’s made of strong material, it should be durable. If you do have any issues with the durability, however, the company offers a 100 percent replacement guarantee.

The guarantee lasts for one year and will be honored with no questions asked.

This shovel has a grip on the handle, which makes it comfortable to use and easier on the hands.

Because the head of this shovel is so narrow, you won’t have to cut a huge plug to reach a small target.

If you are good at pinpointing your target, you’ll be able to cut a small plug once you’ve zeroed in on where the signal is coming from.

The length of the blade on this shovel is good for metal detecting.

You’ll be able to cut plugs at up to a foot at a time, which is as deep as most smaller targets are found from the large majority of amateur metal detectors.

The Mini Root Assassin

If a full-size, 4-pound shovel is still too much weight for you to lug around, you may want to consider using the Mini Root Assassin.

Check latest pricing here for the mini version.​

It works using the same method as the full-size shovel, with the serrated teeth that work in both directions.

But the Mini Root Assassin is a lighter, shorter option at 2.2 pounds.

If you don’t have much upper body strength or you want to conserve your energy for longer detecting sessions, you might want to go with the Mini.

It’s also a good pick for shorter detectorists who have problems wielding a longer shovel.

And it goes without saying that a smaller digging tool is always preferred when hunting in public areas or small residential yards. See our responsible metal detecting guide here.​

Wrapping Up

In addition to your metal detector, a good shovel is a key part of your success as a detectorist.

You’ll need to find a heavy-duty option that is light enough that you’ll be able to hunt day after day with minimal soreness in your arms and back.

No matter which shovel you decided to go with, remember to always fill in your plugs and be a responsible detectorist.

The kinder we are to the ground we search, the more rights we’ll keep as detectorists.

 

Review source: https://www.smarterhobby.com/metal-detecting/root-assassin-shovel-review/
Author name: Mark Orwig

+ Lawn Mower Hut

 

 

 

With a fearsome name and an appearance to match, it’s easy to see why the Root Assassin Shovel is catching the eye of many gardeners. A unique take on the traditional shovel, the Root Assassin is a double-edged serrated shovel with a sharp point that claims to make short work of even the toughest root systems.

Using such a unique design helps the Root Assassin be a very versatile shovel that will make life much easier for a range of gardening tasks. Of course, many gardening products claim to be revolutionary despite being nothing special, which begs the question – is the Root Assassin Shovel worth buying?

Let’s take a closer look and see!

Overview:

 

  • Weighs only 4lb
    • 20 Serrated Blades on Each Side of the Shovel
      • Carbon Steel Blade
      • Reinforced D-Grip Handle
  • Golden Shovels Award Winner
  • 100% Money Back Guarantee For 1 Year

 

 

 

 

Digging

Any shovel that struggles to dig soil and turf won’t be worth much to most gardeners, so it’s great to see how effective the Root Assassin is when it comes to digging.

It slices through turf and other soft materials with incredible ease. Should you want to dig up a hole in your lawn for a shrub, tree, or flower bed, then the Root Assassin will make short work of pretty much everything it digs into!

This makes it especially great at digging up trenches, although the fine point does mean it’s not the best for lawn edging. However, the Root Assassin really comes into its own when digging in tougher soil rich with clay and stones.

Thanks to the serrated edges, the Root Assassin is so much better at digging through tough material than any other shovel on the market. So, if you have a lot of digging to do in rugged terrain, this is certainly the shovel you want for the job!

Dealing with Roots

digging roots with shovel

As the name suggests, the Root Assassin is highly effective at digging through roots. There are plenty of shrubs and bushes that produce very thick, deep roots that are a nightmare to deal with when trying to transport or remove the plant.

The Root Assassin makes short work of these!

Simply sink the shovel into the soil and dig away, and when you come across any type of root you only need to saw at it for a moment and the roots will be easily severed from the plant. They certainly picked an appropriate name for the Root Assassin!

Pruning

The Root Assassin doesn’t just remove roots, as the serrated blade doubles as a handy pruner. The blade is sharp enough to saw through most branches without much issue, although manoeuvring the shovel like a saw does take some getting used to.

While pruning shears are still recommended for thicker branches, the Root Assassin is still a fine alternative – especially if you can’t be bothered grabbing another tool from the shed! Also, the impressive length (4”) of the Root Assassin makes it ideal for pruning hard to reach spots without having to use a ladder!

Usability

The Root Assassin should be easy enough for most gardeners to use, although it’s worth noting that it is rather tall at 4”. Granted around a quarter of that height is the serrated steel blade, but those that are shorter may have some issues when first using the shovel.

The Root Assassin weighs a modest 4lbs, so using it shouldn’t feel too strenuous, while the reinforced D-grip handle offers enough space to use comfortably.

All in all, the Root Assassin is a fantastic shovel well worth investing in! For those with tough digging and lots of deep roots to deal with in their garden, there aren’t many better tools to make your life easier than the Root Assassin!

Review source: http://www.lawnmowerhut.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

+ Raise Your Garden

Move over Jason Bourne. There’s a new assassin in town. And we’re still after the bad guys. Except this time, we’re dealing with weeds, roots, and branches. It’s called the Root Assassin and it’s ready to tackle those weeds, dig up deep roots and slash that branch. You’ll love this slender, rigid tool with serrated teeth for tons of tasks. I have lots of yard to do this fall and like different tools for various jobs. It all depends. But what makes the Root Assassin completely unique? It’s the shovel/saw combo. Never seen the like of it before! It has never occurred to me to use a shovel to saw with. Until now. So I’m thrilled that there are two winners who will get their very own Root Assassin valued at $55. To enter, like the Raise Your Garden Facebook page andshare this post or sign up for our newsletter. For two entries, do both. Let us know you entered by telling us something fun about yourself in the comment section of this post!

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First impressions of the Root Assassin

So there are times my brain tells me it’s okay to nag Tom to do tasks that I really, really don’t want to do. This is especially true when it comes to yard work that requires any upper body strength as I have zero. I’m just not very big. To give Tom credit, he’d help me in my perennial beds, but I’ve declined his help because he doesn’t know where my plants are. He just hacks at everything. Loosing perennials in this way is sad. I still miss my Japanese iris.

And I think I told you we bought my Grandma’s house several years ago? And with it, I inherited her perennial beds with plants. The problem is, over the years of neglect, they got overgrown. Unmanageable. Trees got embedded in there. Shrubs got overgrown. Thick brush took over. Weeds became so strong that they uprooted all else in their path.

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Enter: Root Assassin Shovel. Just now I was working until dark hammering away at a few super roots that had taken over my side perennial bed. For years, they remained there because no ordinary shovel that I could maneuver would be up for the task. Bu-bye roots. I actually got them out myself without Tom’s help. It was pretty easy. Those serrated teeth really hacked away. I just have to double check that I got all of the root out so it doesn’t come back stronger than ever. But that’s a success story!

But be careful! This tool is super sharp which is why it is able to chop branches. But that was my next task. Would it easily slice through a branch? That was the test the Root Assassin would have to pass. Quick answer. Yep. It worked. I hardly knew what to expect. I mean, one hardly expects a shovel to be a saw.

And that’s what so great about the Root Assassin Shovel. The typical saw doesn’t have a handle on it. I always fear that I’m going to saw my fingers off! The long handle gives you some distance from the object you are sawing. The red grippy handle also gives you something to grasp with force.

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Product rundown

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Industrial grade 14-gauge blade
  • Made of solid structural carbon steel and is overlaid with a sleek silver color powder coat
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip for added leverage and control
  • Red handle means you can find when you left it in the garden before the rain comes
  • Steel shaft is topped with durable solid rubber coated bright red handle
  • Weighs 4 pounds

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Ways to use this tool – Think outside the box

  • Trim and prune plants and trees
  • Cut branches still on the tree or on the ground
  • Dig out deep, deep roots – super roots I call them!
  • Edge your lawn
  • Dealing with thick brush
  • Transplant your “big plants” like shrubs or gigantic hostas
  • Landscaping
  • Metal Detecting tool
  • Plant your bulbs deep so the squirrels don’t eat them
  • Take with you on your next camping trip
  • Saw off your Brussel Sprouts from the plant. It worked great for this odd purpose!
  • Terrify intruders to your home. I mean, this tool is fierce. Those serrated teeth will surely scare the bad people away. Just keep under your bed at night. (I’m not kidding!)

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Last thoughts….

It was great hearing Tom shout out the other day “where’s the Root Assassin?” This means he’s going to get a job done. And a dirty shovel is one that is being used! It was intriguing that I found myself sawing away at branches, not because that was a chore that needed to get done, but rather for the fun of it. Just because I can!

And yes, I’ve endorsed other shovels on this site, but certainly not one that can slice through thick, woody branches. That’s just fierce. So it’s about having the right tool for the job. Each has a place. It’s kind of like when you sit down to dinner and you choose between using a fork or a spoon. Some choices are easy. Soup = spoon. Spaghetti = fork. But what about a thick pot roast with a gravy? You might choose both. It’s the same with with shovels and spades. At times you choose one over the over, other times, you’ll use both on the job.

 

Review source: http://www.raiseyourgarden.com/home/saw-away-with-the-root-assassin-shovel-two-winner-giveaway

+ Wisconsin Garden

+ The Garden Swap

Well built sturdy shovel that performed well.

In my original review I listed a con as the price. Recently I was looking at some garden spades and was surprised to see the price of these. Considering the Root Assassin is built much better than any spade I could find, the price really isn’t bad.

The Root Assassin Shovel lived up to its name in a trial in my vegetable garden. Preparing my raised beds for spring planting was easily accomplished as the Root Assassin cut through roots left by last year’s crop, cover crops and invading tree roots.

Roots up to 1 inch or more were so easily cut I barely noticed they were there.

On one raised bed all I did was turn the soil to a depth of about 1 1/2 shovel lengths. After raking the bed smoothed I just hand picked the root pieces that were left on top.

For the second raised bed I dug out some of the soil and sifted it. The Root Assasin did will in the actual digging but it may not have been as good as a standard shovel had my (sandy) soil been very dry.

Just to put the Root Assassin through some of its paces I tried digging a small hole near a tree stump.

The Root Assassin cut through the smaller roots with ease. When I hit the 2″-4″ root it took a little practice to get the shovel to cut. It didn’t take me long to learn and the root was cut within minutes.

One thing though, do not expect to get a straight cut. At least not for me.

My centipede grass has grown well onto my sidewalks as we were not living in the home for about 9 months and the maintenance was let go. I tested the Root Assassin Shovel on edging along my side walk. It cut through the thick mat of grass and roots with no effort. I’ll be finishing this chore at a later time but I will follow up using a week trimmer since the slight  curve of the blade on the Root Assassin does not make a neat straight line.

I did not attemtp to trim any tree branches with the Root Assassin Shovel and don’t think this would be my tool of choice for the chore.

Pros:

  • Strong
  • Well built
  • Cuts roots and grass easily

Cons:

Price – The price plus shipping are little high but product is still worth it if you’ve got root and grass problems.

Recommendations:

I would definetly recommend the Root Assassin Shovel.

 

Review Source: http://thegardenswap.com/rootassassinreview.aspx/
Author name: Wayne Schaefer

+ Miss Smarty Plants

Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel

As I sit down to write this, I am pondering two possible titles, “Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel” or “My New Favorite Shovel.” Hmmm. When the folks from the Root Assassin sent me a shovel to test for this review I was initially skeptical. It is kind of a crazy looking thing!  Almost like an alligator, chainsaw, and shovel had a baby.

 

I was waiting for the perfect project to give the Root Assassin a project it deserved. I mean you can’t use something called the Root Assassin to plant pansies!  We are working on a major yard renovation and I knew this would be the perfect opportunity. My dad came to town and we were cutting down trees, removing palms and getting busy on our projects. We removed a 25′ tall viburnum from the corner of the shed and this gave us two opportunities to test out the Root Assassin.

The first project was for digging and transplanting this large bromeliad. As you can see, the roots of the viburnum were intertwined with the bromeliad, yet we wanted to try to keep as large of a root ball as possible. We tied up the plant (the serrated edges of the bromeliad will really tear into your legs!), and I started working my way around with the Root Assassin. It was a breeze. The upper edges of the shovel have a reinforced edge to use your foot for extra push and it took less that three minutes to pop this plant out of the ground.

 

Once the viburnum was cut down it left our shed extremely visible and in need of a little more cover. I’ve been plant lusting for a Japanese Fern Tree, Filicium decipiens, for a few years but didn’t have anywhere to plant it until now. But of course I wanted to plant it approximately one foot from the trunk of the previous viburnums. If this was a small plant it may not have been much of an issue, but this plant was in a 30 gallon container almost  30″ in diameter and needed a large hole.

This is where the Root Assassin really shines. Using the shovel in a sawing motion takes some getting used to, but it very quickly cuts through large roots in the ground.  I think I could have been at this project for a long time if I hadn’t been using this shovel. I used the Root Assassin to cut large roots, some up to 2″ in diameter, and clear the hole without too much of a problem. In fact, because March Madness was on tv, I actually did this during halftime of the Iowa basketball game!

Overall the shovel is very light and just the right length for using the handle for leverage and also getting in tight areas. I have a bad habit of kind of using my shovels like crowbars to pry out plants and while my other shovels creak and grown (and will surely snap one day) the Root Assassin stood strong. And while this might sound like a trivial point, the red handle makes it easy to find too!

Root Assassin Shovel

 

 

If I have any criticism of the Root Assassin shovel it would be that I am a little afraid I will cut through an irrigation pipe with it!  My regular shovels won’t hurt these pipes, but when I get into the sawing motion with the Root Assassin I have a feeling I could cut through some pvc without even realizing it. I do take some care when I know I am near these pipes and haven’t had any issues yet.

Our next trial for the Root Assassin was to dig a large hole through established perennial peanut groundcover. By this point my dad and I were arguing over who got to use the Root Assassin and who had to use the “regular” shovel.   In my dad’s words, “Boy, that shovel really cuts through.”  Who would have thought he would be a converted fan too?

If you’ve ever tried to plant anything in an established bed of perennial peanut you probably found that the hardest part is cutting through the tough, wiry stems and roots. The Root Assassin did a great job for this task. We used the Root Assassin in a sawing motion to dig the perimeter and then remove the roots. Once that was cleared it was easier to use a regular spade to remove the sandy soil and dig to the depth for the new palm.

 

As our yard renovations continue it is a constant argument over which one of us gets to use the Root Assassin. If you are constantly battling roots and tough digging conditions I would recommend the Root Assassin. As the name so boldly states, it will tear through the toughest of soils and roots to make digging, transplanting or any garden work a pleasure. You can find more information on the Root Assassin through their website.

While I did receive a complimentary Root Assassin Shovel, the opinions provided here are my own. And yes, I would purchase one again.

 

Review source: http://misssmartyplants.com/root-assassin/
Author name: Keri Byrum

+ Garden Bunch

 

Review: I currently own several shovels, one for all purpose digging, and one for spading earth. Both work fine, and have held up for years to the basic needs of my gardening tasks.


deep into the clay. It also did great at digging up the rocks, based mostly on the more triangular shape of the blade. The blade is 2” wide at the digging end, 16 ½” long, and 6” wide at the top, with slight edges on top for to leverage with your foot when digging.

When it came to chopping up larger clods of soil, just turn it on it’s side and use the serrated edges. It made light work of this step.

This shovel only weighs 4 lbs, so was easy for me to use. I’m only 5’ 2”, so thought it might be a bit tall for me, but I really didn’t have any issues with the length, especially after inserting into the ground. I also love that it’s all metal with a heavy plastic handle, and easy to hose off when I was done with it.


This is honestly my new favorite shovel. I’m super happy with it, and highly recommend you give it a try in your own garden. I think it will become one of your “go to” tools! think it will become one of your “go to” tools!

 

Review Source: http://gardenbunch.com/product-reviews/root-assassin-shovel-and-saw/
Review by ChristineGB

+ DIY Garden

Is your dream of an outdoor sanctuary hindered by dense, scrubby bushes and weeds? Does the thought of backbreaking digging prevent you from transforming your overgrown jungle into a relaxing haven?

Then look no further than the Root Assassin Shovel!root assassin shovel

Large holes and strong roots are no match for this extreme spade, meaning you can clear the undergrowth in no time without any hard labor.

It was a friend who first introduced me to the wonders of the Root Assassin. Having just moved into a new house, life was hectic and I simply didn’t have the time to spend tidying the neglected wilderness of my back garden. Desperate for a quick fix, I called a few landscaping companies but was shocked by the extortionate prices quoted to me. I was moaning about the predicament to my green fingered friend when she suggested I borrow her Root Assassin.

Initially, I was a little skeptical. The Root Assassin sounded like it would be more at home in a Tarantino movie than a garden. The serrated teeth added to its fearsome image, giving it the appearance of a halved shark’s head. It certainly looked fierce, but would it really make my garden woes a thing of the past?

The first thing I tackled was a large untamed Burning Bush that was swamping a large chunk of my yard. Anyone familiar with these hardy shrubs will know that the intense root system makes them a nightmare to remove. Not with the Root Assassin though. The unique structure of the toothed edge swiftly chomped its way through the roots.

Impressed and spurred on by my success, I moved on to the large section of privet hedge that fenced off an old vegetable patch. Again, no contest. The Root Assassin slid into the earth and sliced through the roots with one easy push. No straining or sweating involved.

I soldiered on and managed to clear the whole garden in one enjoyable afternoon. It was an absolute breeze! I went out the next day and bought a Root Assassin shovel for myself, knowing it would come in handy for future projects. And I haven’t been disappointed. I excavated a 14-foot-long trench to make a raised flower bed with minimal hassle, and when I realised what a cinch it was, I went ahead and dug out the foundation for a 12×6 foot patio too.

At just 4lbs, the shovel is so lightweight that it’s a pleasure to work with, and the carbon steel frame guarantees that it will withstand the elements. Along with removing unwanted shrubs and digging out earth, I have also used my Root Assassin to saw off stray branches on my birch tree without difficulty. The long handle gives access to higher limbs without the need for a ladder. Sawing with the shovel will dull the serrated teeth over time, but they can be sharpened using a wheel or grinder.

It’s almost a month since I bought my Root Assassin shovel, and it has rapidly become my favourite tool for a multitude of garden tasks. Saving time, effort and money across the board, it really is the jack of all spades!

+ Gardening Products Review

One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Nevertheless, I was skeptical. All my life I’ve gardened in dense clay soil, and my current garden is on a rocky ridge where I deal with both clay and stones. I doubted even this aggressive-looking shovel would be up to the challenging task.

pruning branches with Root Assassin

While slightly cumbersome to wield, the shovel did indeed saw through branches, even thick ones.

The video on the company’s website shows the shovel being used as a saw to cut through limbs as well as delving in the ground, cutting effortlessly through turf, and slicing through pesky roots with a single swipe. Again, I was skeptical. Would this shovel really work in the real world? Is this truly “Super Shovel,” coming to the rescue of gardeners who battle with roots and rocks and difficult soil? Can it do all that and prune branches?

Pruning Branches

penetrating turf with Root Assassin shovel

I casually stuck the blade into the grass to stand it up, and was surprised how easily it sunk deeply into the turf – deeper than shown in this photograph.

First I tried it as a saw to prune branches. While it was a little awkward to use a shovel to cut through wood, and it wasn’t as efficient as a bow saw, it worked. If you’re digging in the garden with your Root Assassin shovel and see a branch that needs trimming, you can deal with it right away, saving yourself a hike to the tool shed or garage to get another tool.

Penetrating Turf

digging thru roots with Root Assassin shovel

When you encounter a root, continue to dig and pull up against the intruding fibers. The shovel sliced through them with ease, making digging easy.

It was startling how easily The Root Assassin cut through turf, slicing through the thick mass of roots like a hot knife through soft butter. Clearly this is the tool you want if you’re planting in grass. The pointed tip, designed to penetrate through tough soil, would allow you to cut the perfect diameter holes for planting bulbs such as crocus or spring star flowers (Ipheon) in the lawn, and digging holes for trees or shrubs would be a snap.

Unfortunately, the pointed tip and slight curve of the blade makes the shovel unsuitable for edging, as it would be very difficult to cut a straight, sharp line. On the flip side, this is a superb tool for cutting deep and narrow trenches, so while the Root Assassin shovel can successfully multitask, it cannot – and should not be expected to – do everything.

Digging and Cutting Through Roots

long Root Assassin shovel

It would have been a little easier for me to dig with the Root Assassin if I were taller.

The Root Assassin also lived up to its claim as a root eater. We tackled a dead shrub that needed removing, so it didn’t take long to encounter roots of significant girth. A little sawing accompanied by continued digging, and each root was easily severed. The shovel worked like a charm, making a potentially challenging job much, much easier.

Ease of Use

handle on Root Assassin shovel

The padded handle is easy to grip and comfortable.

The solid steel shovel stands 4 feet tall. The narrow, commercial grade 14-gauge steel pointed blade represents at least 12” of that length. At 5’3” tall, I found getting my foot firmly on the step in a position where I could put my weight and strength onto the blade for digging was a bit like climbing onto stilts. However, my 6”4” tall husband had no problem whatsoever. It would be nice if the shovel came in different sizes: large, medium and small – or tall, mid-height, and short.

The handgrip is comfortably wide, accommodating large or small hands, and is made of reinforced rubber that is both durable and slip-proof.

foot step on Root Assassin shovel

The manufacturers claim the step is angled, but I didn’t notice that. However, I’m sure it didn’t matter one way or the other.

The manufacturers claim the step is forward turned for secure foot placement, but I couldn’t see it. To my eye it looked almost perfectly parallel to the ground if the shovel is held straight upright.

Specifications and Features

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Commercial grade carbon steel 14-gauge blade
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip, reinforced rubber handle for added leverage and control
  • Weighs 4 pounds
  • Retails for $59.99

Recommendation

5 Shovels Rating from Gardening Products ReviewOften hybrid tools end up doing neither job well. The Root Assassin is a happy exception. If you are digging a hole in a root-infested area, this is the perfect tool. While I would not pick up this tool simply to cut off a branch, if it’s in my hand when a branch for cutting presents itself, it will do the job effectively.

The Root Assassin Shovel lives up to its name, and to the claims made by the manufacturer. I highly recommend it.

The company can be reached online through their website www.Rootassassinshovel.com. The Root Assassin is a patented all-purpose garden shovel and saw.

Where to Buy

The Root Assassin shovel is available directly from the manufacturer or through Amazon. The retail price is $59.99 at either location, plus shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

+ Gardening Products Review

At the end of each year, the Gardening Products Review takes a close look at all of the products we’ve reviewed that year. We then award up to five products with the Golden Shovel Award for outstanding garden product.

In 2014, we had a lot a fabulous products to choose from, including some new introductions, as well as some that have been around the block a few times. Our reviewers weighed in with their favorites and we also heard from many of our readers. We revisited some of the products that we reviewed earlier in the year, checked how well products were holding up after extended use, and looked at which items got the most use from our testers and home gardeners.

After weighing the pros and cons of all of the gardening products, we’re proud to announce the 2014 winners of the Golden Shovel Awards!

2014 Golden Shovel Award Winners – Editor’s Choice

 

Review of Bear Wallow rose gauntlet glovesBear Wallow Gloves Rose Gauntlets – At first glance, these gauntlet-style gloves look like a pair of regular leather gardening gloves with a sleeve sewn on. Kind of a home-made look (which makes sense – they’re hand-made right here in the USA). But don’t let that fool you – these are hands down the absolute best pair of gardening gloves I’ve ever used for pruning roses..

 

HERShovel-featuredHERShovel Ergonomic Shovel for Women – HERS® is a hybrid tool that combines the features of both shovel and spade, designed with women’s bodies, height, and digging style in mind. Women will find that it offers lighter weight, improved leverage, and larger capacity than most shovels.

 

 

Root Assassin shovel reviewRoot Assassin Shovel – One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Often hybrid tools end up doing neither job well but this easy-to-use shovel not only cuts easily through root-infested soil, it also prunes branches and sinks into turf easily.

 

 

Spear Head Spade reviewSpear Head Spade – This precision digging tool combines some of the best characteristics of a spade with a garden axe or knife. Lightweight yet sturdy, it makes quick work of a wide range of garden tasks. It is a great addition to the tool shed—but not a replacement for other shovels. What it does, it does much, much better than less specialized digging tools.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/2014-golden-shovel-awards-best-gardening-product/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway