Reviews

Root Assassin

Golden Gark

if you work with the ground at all, you know the importance of a good shovel. With an ordinary shovel, you have to put a lot of weight on it to even crack the ground sometimes, let alone dig a good-size hole. But with a great shovel like the Root Assassin, it feels like you’re slicing butter.

The Root Assassin shovel is one tool a metal detectorist may want to consider adding to his arsenal.

The company was kind enough to send us their digger to review. Here’s what we think:​

Why Is the Root Assassin Good for Detectorists?

As metal detectorists, we’re sunk if we don’t have a great shovel by our side.

Without the right shovel, you’ll never be able to dig deep enough in tough ground to reach our targets, especially if there are tree roots or gravel involved.

And if we can’t dig deep enough, it doesn’t matter that we’ve found great targets — we’ll never be able to unearth them.

Plus, if you fatigue yourself just by digging a few targets, you’re not going to detect as long as you would if you weren’t tired.

The more time you spend out there detecting, the better your odds of making that once-in-a-lifetime discovery. And isn’t that what every detectorist dreams about?

The Root Assassin is a heavy-duty shovel made for tough roots. That’s important for detectorists, especially if they like to search by big, old trees.

I’ve had great success looking by old trees that I imagine were used as shade back in the day by people looking for a place to escape the summer heat.

I’ve found jewelry, coins, gold-plated lift-arm lighters and a lot of old toy cars, ships and helicopters by shade trees. And let me tell you, it wasn’t easy.

I was in a battle with a lot of thick, tough roots that were protecting all the signals I was trying to reach.

The only thing that saved me was using a shovel with serrated teeth.

When there are roots involved, shovels with serrated teeth, like the Root Assassin, will help you recover targets quickly and with less effort than a traditional shovel.

Features

The best feature on this shovel is the 16 serrated teeth that are found on each side.

Here is what is unique about these teeth — they cut while digging in and when you pull your shovel out.

That double action makes quick work of the root you’re trying to cut and get out of your way.

The teeth also help when you’re searching in heavy clay soil that is a pain to dig with a traditional shovel.

The other great thing about this shovel is how easy it is to lift and carry around with you.

It only weighs 4 pounds.

As a detectorist, you’re going to be lugging around a lot of equipment already, especially if you’re doing a day-long hunt in a remote area.

You’ll already be carrying your detector, a pinpointer, your treasure bag, plus any water, food, bug spray and sunblock you take with you on an extended hunt.

The last thing you need is a heavy shovel to take with you.

Because this shovel doesn’t weigh much, you’ll be able to take it with you and use it for hours without feeling exhausted and calling it a day early.

It cuts a neat plug, which is crucial as a detectorist.

Whether you’re hunting at a public place like a park or you’ve been granted special permission to detect on private property, you don’t want to earn a reputation as a detectorist who tears up the property he searches.

If you don’t learn how to cut a neat plug, word will spread and fewer people will be willing to let you search their grounds.

The Root Assassin is made of steel which is then treated with a silver powder coat paint.

Since it’s made of strong material, it should be durable. If you do have any issues with the durability, however, the company offers a 100 percent replacement guarantee.

The guarantee lasts for one year and will be honored with no questions asked.

This shovel has a grip on the handle, which makes it comfortable to use and easier on the hands.

Because the head of this shovel is so narrow, you won’t have to cut a huge plug to reach a small target.

If you are good at pinpointing your target, you’ll be able to cut a small plug once you’ve zeroed in on where the signal is coming from.

The length of the blade on this shovel is good for metal detecting.

You’ll be able to cut plugs at up to a foot at a time, which is as deep as most smaller targets are found from the large majority of amateur metal detectors.

The Mini Root Assassin

If a full-size, 4-pound shovel is still too much weight for you to lug around, you may want to consider using the Mini Root Assassin.

Check latest pricing here for the mini version.​

It works using the same method as the full-size shovel, with the serrated teeth that work in both directions.

But the Mini Root Assassin is a lighter, shorter option at 2.2 pounds.

If you don’t have much upper body strength or you want to conserve your energy for longer detecting sessions, you might want to go with the Mini.

It’s also a good pick for shorter detectorists who have problems wielding a longer shovel.

And it goes without saying that a smaller digging tool is always preferred when hunting in public areas or small residential yards. See our responsible metal detecting guide here.​

Wrapping Up

In addition to your metal detector, a good shovel is a key part of your success as a detectorist.

You’ll need to find a heavy-duty option that is light enough that you’ll be able to hunt day after day with minimal soreness in your arms and back.

No matter which shovel you decided to go with, remember to always fill in your plugs and be a responsible detectorist.

The kinder we are to the ground we search, the more rights we’ll keep as detectorists.

 

Review source: https://www.smarterhobby.com/metal-detecting/root-assassin-shovel-review/
Author name: Mark Orwig

Move over Jason Bourne. There’s a new assassin in town. And we’re still after the bad guys. Except this time, we’re dealing with weeds, roots, and branches. It’s called the Root Assassin and it’s ready to tackle those weeds, dig up deep roots and slash that branch. You’ll love this slender, rigid tool with serrated teeth for tons of tasks. I have lots of yard to do this fall and like different tools for various jobs. It all depends. But what makes the Root Assassin completely unique? It’s the shovel/saw combo. Never seen the like of it before! It has never occurred to me to use a shovel to saw with. Until now. So I’m thrilled that there are two winners who will get their very own Root Assassin valued at $55. To enter, like the Raise Your Garden Facebook page andshare this post or sign up for our newsletter. For two entries, do both. Let us know you entered by telling us something fun about yourself in the comment section of this post!

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First impressions of the Root Assassin

So there are times my brain tells me it’s okay to nag Tom to do tasks that I really, really don’t want to do. This is especially true when it comes to yard work that requires any upper body strength as I have zero. I’m just not very big. To give Tom credit, he’d help me in my perennial beds, but I’ve declined his help because he doesn’t know where my plants are. He just hacks at everything. Loosing perennials in this way is sad. I still miss my Japanese iris.

And I think I told you we bought my Grandma’s house several years ago? And with it, I inherited her perennial beds with plants. The problem is, over the years of neglect, they got overgrown. Unmanageable. Trees got embedded in there. Shrubs got overgrown. Thick brush took over. Weeds became so strong that they uprooted all else in their path.

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Enter: Root Assassin Shovel. Just now I was working until dark hammering away at a few super roots that had taken over my side perennial bed. For years, they remained there because no ordinary shovel that I could maneuver would be up for the task. Bu-bye roots. I actually got them out myself without Tom’s help. It was pretty easy. Those serrated teeth really hacked away. I just have to double check that I got all of the root out so it doesn’t come back stronger than ever. But that’s a success story!

But be careful! This tool is super sharp which is why it is able to chop branches. But that was my next task. Would it easily slice through a branch? That was the test the Root Assassin would have to pass. Quick answer. Yep. It worked. I hardly knew what to expect. I mean, one hardly expects a shovel to be a saw.

And that’s what so great about the Root Assassin Shovel. The typical saw doesn’t have a handle on it. I always fear that I’m going to saw my fingers off! The long handle gives you some distance from the object you are sawing. The red grippy handle also gives you something to grasp with force.

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Product rundown

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Industrial grade 14-gauge blade
  • Made of solid structural carbon steel and is overlaid with a sleek silver color powder coat
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip for added leverage and control
  • Red handle means you can find when you left it in the garden before the rain comes
  • Steel shaft is topped with durable solid rubber coated bright red handle
  • Weighs 4 pounds

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Ways to use this tool – Think outside the box

  • Trim and prune plants and trees
  • Cut branches still on the tree or on the ground
  • Dig out deep, deep roots – super roots I call them!
  • Edge your lawn
  • Dealing with thick brush
  • Transplant your “big plants” like shrubs or gigantic hostas
  • Landscaping
  • Metal Detecting tool
  • Plant your bulbs deep so the squirrels don’t eat them
  • Take with you on your next camping trip
  • Saw off your Brussel Sprouts from the plant. It worked great for this odd purpose!
  • Terrify intruders to your home. I mean, this tool is fierce. Those serrated teeth will surely scare the bad people away. Just keep under your bed at night. (I’m not kidding!)

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Last thoughts….

It was great hearing Tom shout out the other day “where’s the Root Assassin?” This means he’s going to get a job done. And a dirty shovel is one that is being used! It was intriguing that I found myself sawing away at branches, not because that was a chore that needed to get done, but rather for the fun of it. Just because I can!

And yes, I’ve endorsed other shovels on this site, but certainly not one that can slice through thick, woody branches. That’s just fierce. So it’s about having the right tool for the job. Each has a place. It’s kind of like when you sit down to dinner and you choose between using a fork or a spoon. Some choices are easy. Soup = spoon. Spaghetti = fork. But what about a thick pot roast with a gravy? You might choose both. It’s the same with with shovels and spades. At times you choose one over the over, other times, you’ll use both on the job.

 

Review source: http://www.raiseyourgarden.com/home/saw-away-with-the-root-assassin-shovel-two-winner-giveaway

Well built sturdy shovel that performed well.

In my original review I listed a con as the price. Recently I was looking at some garden spades and was surprised to see the price of these. Considering the Root Assassin is built much better than any spade I could find, the price really isn’t bad.

The Root Assassin Shovel lived up to its name in a trial in my vegetable garden. Preparing my raised beds for spring planting was easily accomplished as the Root Assassin cut through roots left by last year’s crop, cover crops and invading tree roots.

Roots up to 1 inch or more were so easily cut I barely noticed they were there.

On one raised bed all I did was turn the soil to a depth of about 1 1/2 shovel lengths. After raking the bed smoothed I just hand picked the root pieces that were left on top.

For the second raised bed I dug out some of the soil and sifted it. The Root Assasin did will in the actual digging but it may not have been as good as a standard shovel had my (sandy) soil been very dry.

Just to put the Root Assassin through some of its paces I tried digging a small hole near a tree stump.

The Root Assassin cut through the smaller roots with ease. When I hit the 2″-4″ root it took a little practice to get the shovel to cut. It didn’t take me long to learn and the root was cut within minutes.

One thing though, do not expect to get a straight cut. At least not for me.

My centipede grass has grown well onto my sidewalks as we were not living in the home for about 9 months and the maintenance was let go. I tested the Root Assassin Shovel on edging along my side walk. It cut through the thick mat of grass and roots with no effort. I’ll be finishing this chore at a later time but I will follow up using a week trimmer since the slight  curve of the blade on the Root Assassin does not make a neat straight line.

I did not attemtp to trim any tree branches with the Root Assassin Shovel and don’t think this would be my tool of choice for the chore.

Pros:

  • Strong
  • Well built
  • Cuts roots and grass easily

Cons:

Price – The price plus shipping are little high but product is still worth it if you’ve got root and grass problems.

Recommendations:

I would definetly recommend the Root Assassin Shovel.

 

Review Source: http://thegardenswap.com/rootassassinreview.aspx/
Author name: Wayne Schaefer

Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel

As I sit down to write this, I am pondering two possible titles, “Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel” or “My New Favorite Shovel.” Hmmm. When the folks from the Root Assassin sent me a shovel to test for this review I was initially skeptical. It is kind of a crazy looking thing!  Almost like an alligator, chainsaw, and shovel had a baby.

 

I was waiting for the perfect project to give the Root Assassin a project it deserved. I mean you can’t use something called the Root Assassin to plant pansies!  We are working on a major yard renovation and I knew this would be the perfect opportunity. My dad came to town and we were cutting down trees, removing palms and getting busy on our projects. We removed a 25′ tall viburnum from the corner of the shed and this gave us two opportunities to test out the Root Assassin.

The first project was for digging and transplanting this large bromeliad. As you can see, the roots of the viburnum were intertwined with the bromeliad, yet we wanted to try to keep as large of a root ball as possible. We tied up the plant (the serrated edges of the bromeliad will really tear into your legs!), and I started working my way around with the Root Assassin. It was a breeze. The upper edges of the shovel have a reinforced edge to use your foot for extra push and it took less that three minutes to pop this plant out of the ground.

 

Once the viburnum was cut down it left our shed extremely visible and in need of a little more cover. I’ve been plant lusting for a Japanese Fern Tree, Filicium decipiens, for a few years but didn’t have anywhere to plant it until now. But of course I wanted to plant it approximately one foot from the trunk of the previous viburnums. If this was a small plant it may not have been much of an issue, but this plant was in a 30 gallon container almost  30″ in diameter and needed a large hole.

This is where the Root Assassin really shines. Using the shovel in a sawing motion takes some getting used to, but it very quickly cuts through large roots in the ground.  I think I could have been at this project for a long time if I hadn’t been using this shovel. I used the Root Assassin to cut large roots, some up to 2″ in diameter, and clear the hole without too much of a problem. In fact, because March Madness was on tv, I actually did this during halftime of the Iowa basketball game!

Overall the shovel is very light and just the right length for using the handle for leverage and also getting in tight areas. I have a bad habit of kind of using my shovels like crowbars to pry out plants and while my other shovels creak and grown (and will surely snap one day) the Root Assassin stood strong. And while this might sound like a trivial point, the red handle makes it easy to find too!

Root Assassin Shovel

 

 

If I have any criticism of the Root Assassin shovel it would be that I am a little afraid I will cut through an irrigation pipe with it!  My regular shovels won’t hurt these pipes, but when I get into the sawing motion with the Root Assassin I have a feeling I could cut through some pvc without even realizing it. I do take some care when I know I am near these pipes and haven’t had any issues yet.

Our next trial for the Root Assassin was to dig a large hole through established perennial peanut groundcover. By this point my dad and I were arguing over who got to use the Root Assassin and who had to use the “regular” shovel.   In my dad’s words, “Boy, that shovel really cuts through.”  Who would have thought he would be a converted fan too?

If you’ve ever tried to plant anything in an established bed of perennial peanut you probably found that the hardest part is cutting through the tough, wiry stems and roots. The Root Assassin did a great job for this task. We used the Root Assassin in a sawing motion to dig the perimeter and then remove the roots. Once that was cleared it was easier to use a regular spade to remove the sandy soil and dig to the depth for the new palm.

 

As our yard renovations continue it is a constant argument over which one of us gets to use the Root Assassin. If you are constantly battling roots and tough digging conditions I would recommend the Root Assassin. As the name so boldly states, it will tear through the toughest of soils and roots to make digging, transplanting or any garden work a pleasure. You can find more information on the Root Assassin through their website.

While I did receive a complimentary Root Assassin Shovel, the opinions provided here are my own. And yes, I would purchase one again.

 

Review source: http://misssmartyplants.com/root-assassin/
Author name: Keri Byrum

 

Review: I currently own several shovels, one for all purpose digging, and one for spading earth. Both work fine, and have held up for years to the basic needs of my gardening tasks.


deep into the clay. It also did great at digging up the rocks, based mostly on the more triangular shape of the blade. The blade is 2” wide at the digging end, 16 ½” long, and 6” wide at the top, with slight edges on top for to leverage with your foot when digging.

When it came to chopping up larger clods of soil, just turn it on it’s side and use the serrated edges. It made light work of this step.

This shovel only weighs 4 lbs, so was easy for me to use. I’m only 5’ 2”, so thought it might be a bit tall for me, but I really didn’t have any issues with the length, especially after inserting into the ground. I also love that it’s all metal with a heavy plastic handle, and easy to hose off when I was done with it.


This is honestly my new favorite shovel. I’m super happy with it, and highly recommend you give it a try in your own garden. I think it will become one of your “go to” tools! think it will become one of your “go to” tools!

 

Review Source: http://gardenbunch.com/product-reviews/root-assassin-shovel-and-saw/
Review by ChristineGB

Ah, The Netherlands, home of windmills, tulips, wooden shoes,…and the Golden Gark rake. If you’re like me, you want to know what the hashtag is a gark? Urban dictionary informed me that a gark is “a universal word that can be substituted to mean anything you want it to be” and can be used as a noun, verb, adjective, etc. Perhaps that’s why The Golden Gark (distributed by The Root Assassin—“Unique Garden Tools That Work”) is promoted as a 3-in-1 tool: rake, shovel, and sifter. In other words, the Golden Gark can be anything you want it to be. But does it live up to its hip hype?

SPECIFICATIONS

Weight: 1.76 pounds
Shipping Weight: 3.75 pounds
Overall Length: 62”
Materials: 20 polycarbonate tines; plastic D handle; powder-coated aluminum shaft.
Tine dimensions: 8 ½” long, 14 ¼” wide
Warranty: 1 year free-of-charge replacement (not refund)

MINIMAL ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

Lifting the BIG cardboard box from my front door, I thought the shipping company had inadvertently mailed me an empty box! For the size of the box, it was shockingly lightweight.

When I opened it, my amusement continued. Here’s this featherweight product next to a shipping label with such menacing words: ROOT ASSASSIN.

The Gold Gark Pack

At first glance, I was underwhelmed.

I spent more time looking for a screwdriver than I did assembling the tool. Within 3 minutes, tool in hand, I headed outside to put it through some paces.

One screw attaches the comfortable D-handle for the shaft.

Two screws fix the head to the shaft. Plastic caps cover the tops of the screws.

A GARK BY ANY OTHER NAME…

While the Golden Gark claims to serve as a rake, shovel, and sifter, I got hung up on just the word “rake.” When I think of a rake, I think of three very different tools in my shed that I use each year: a leaf rake, a steel rake (aka, bow, common, or garden variety), and a dethatching rake. Let me say upfront that I will not be able to replace all three of these rakes with the Golden Gark. The polycarbonate tines lack the weight and rigidity to dethatch your grass. Nor will I use this in the place of a single shovel. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Besides, even given those limitations, I couldn’t help but love this little tool. Read why.

the Golden Gark

Can the Golden Gark replace all of these tools? Well…read on.

I tested the Golden Gark to see how it would perform 4 functions:

  • A leaf rake
  • A garden rake
  • A shovel
  • A sifter

Test 1: A leaf rake

North Carolina might proclaim First in Flight on its license plates, but I think it could also be called the Most Leafy state. I could rake leaves from October until May and still not get them all.

My traditional leaf rake with molded-plastic tines covers 32” of ground with each sweep. The problem is, that big size tempts me to overload it until the spine joining the tines to the head cracks. I go through at least two of these rakes each season. Those spineless tines lack the strength to clear away half of the leaves in their path. The straight shaft of the old-fashioned leaf rake presents a second problem: it encourages over-reaching and unnecessary bending. I already have back pain; I’m not looking for more.

How would the Golden Gark stand up to the leaves in my yard? And how would my back hold up? I held it tine-side down like a conventional leaf rake. The slightly bent angle of the shaft exerts natural pressure on the ground from the 20 tines. A couple of gentle pulls across the ground, and the ground became leaf-free.

The Golden Gark covers less than half of the ground of my traditional plastic rake, around 14”. That smaller head size, coupled with the polycarbonate tines, creates great flexibility and strength. And the bent shaft allowed me to work from an upright position, meaning no back strain.

As a leaf rake, I loved it! Best leaf rake I’ve ever used.

Test 2: A garden rake

I often use my leaf and garden rakes to clear hedge clippings. The oversized head on leaf rakes snags on still-attached branches, and it can’t fit between the hedges to clear away clippings. While metal garden rakes don’t get snagged, they tend to displace mulch on the ground that I want to stay put.

Having recently trimmed my hedges, I put the rake on task to clear cut branches from the hedges and surrounding ground. The light weight made it easy to lift my arms above my head to clear away cut segments from the tops of the hedges, and the small head size made it easy to maneuver between hedges.

The GG left my mulch behind but allowed me to rake up and then scoop out trimmings.

Flipping the tool like a scoop (which is a better description than “shovel”), I pushed it along the ground where it had no problem getting under pine cones, needles, twigs, Sweet Gum balls, etc. Normally, I use a garden rake to take on this sort of debris. The strong, metal tines stand up to anything I’m strong enough to pull; however, the short tines mean it clogs up quickly and has to be cleaned out.

In no time, I created a neat pile. Like with my metal rake, the tines became clogged with pine cones and Sweet Gum balls, but not as quickly.

One thing I can’t do with the Golden Gark that I can do with my metal garden rake is feed a fire. A couple of times each year, I burn twigs and branches in my fire pit. Sticking the polycarbonate head of the rake into the fire would be bad for the rake…and the environment.

Even though this tool can’t stand the heat of a fire, I really liked it as a garden rake.

Using it as a scoop, it skims the ground picking up pine cones and sweet gum balls with ease.

Test 3: A shovel

Golden Gark claims it’s a 3:1 tool, doing the work of a rake, shovel, and sifter. As I mentioned earlier, I like the term “scoop” instead of “shovel.” Why? You will not be digging holes in your yard or loading gravel into a wheelbarrow using the Golden Gark as a shovel. It’s not that kind of shovel. But you can push leaves, pine cones, and debris into a pile with ease. That’s a scoop. From there, you can scoop debris into a trash can or wheelbarrow. I’ll bet you could use this as a snow scoop, too.

It’s not a hoe, but it removed fast-growing spring weeds by the roots.

Standing upright, I pushed the pile of material 5 feet away to the edge of the woods. I’ve broken quite a few plastic leaf rakes doing this same thing. But this time, nothing broke! And because of its light weight, I cleared a large patch of ground quickly and with no fatigue.

Eying the pile of double-ground mulch in my backyard, I wondered how it would hold up to something heavier. Using a combination of pushing like a shovel and pulling like a rake, I quickly spread two yards. The light weight came in handy again. I didn’t get tired. No, you can’t lift up a scoopful of mulch with the Golden Gark, but the design makes it easy to push it along the ground to dump it into place.

As an added bonus, running the tool along the ground as a scoop pulled short-rooted spring weeds up like magic.

As a shovel (again, scoop!) tasked with moving piles of garden debris, I liked the Golden Gark.

Test 4: A sifter

My wife recently hoed and turned our raised garden beds. Flipping the rake around as a shovel, I scooped up a section of earth and shook it from side-to-side. Sure enough, the non-compacted soil fell through the tines, and I was left with a scoop of balled up dirt and rocks. It reminded me of cleaning out a litter box, something I have too much experience doing.

The GG easily sifts out topsoil from rocks, dirt clods, and weeds.

A few days later, I tried the Golden Gark as a pond skimmer. Full-disclosure: I haven’t cleaned my pond for a couple of years, ever since the pump died. Or maybe that’s why the pump died. Either way, my pond held equal parts of scum and water. To get it running again, I needed to clean out the muck. Skimming the top of the pond, I quickly filtered off the layer of floating debris. Then I flipped it around to scoop from the bottom.

The GG excels as a pond cleaner/skimmer.

 

It’s mean on filth, but gentle on liners and pond wildlife

Did I mention it’s been a few years since I cleaned out my pond? Several inches of sludge sat at the bottom. The tines sagged and bent under the weight of filth. Instead of lifting it out, I slid the scoop across the bottom of the pond—without damaging the liner—and slipped the full rake out. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, “Why lift when you can slide?” The Garden Gark proved much more efficient than my little net skimmer and much safer on the liner than a shovel!

As a sifter/strainer/pond cleaner, I loved the Golden Gark.

WARRANTY

Golden Gark

Strong yet flexible, meaning the GG springs back from abuse

Root Assassin LLC stands by every product they sell. If for any reason you are not satisfied with your purchase, they will replace the item free of charge within 1 year of purchase.

RECOMMENDATION

The Golden Gark costs more than your ordinary plastic leaf rake ($19 to $33), your garden variety—pun intended—metal garden rake ($20 to $45), or your typical pond skimmer ($18 to $30). But having tested it rigorously, my search for a leaf (and medium duty garden rake) and pond skimmer that will last longer than one season is over!

WHERE TO BUY

You can purchase the Golden Gark for $44.99 directly from Root Assassin or $49.99 with Amazon Prime membership with free next day shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/golden-gark-rake-review/

Author Name: Scott Carbonara

Meet the Golden Gark from Root Assassin

Okay, you ask what in the world is a “Gark” and why do you need one?  I went online to find the meaning of a gark.  I searched several dictionaries and finally discovered at the urbandictionary.com site that “the word is a universal word that can be substituted to mean anything you want it to be whether you want to use it as a noun, verb, or adjective.”  So, take a gander of the Golden Gark from Root Assassin.

Meet the Golden Gark from Root Assassin

Actually, in this case, the Golden Gark is an excellent gardening tool from the Netherlands.  This multifunctional tool combines raking, shoveling and sifting functions to be used in your garden, backyard or stable.  Clean your backyard from leaves and all other dirt with the Gark.

 

Thank you Root Assassin for providing me with a Golden Gark for the purpose of this review.  

I was intrigued when I first saw the Golden Gark.  I had to find out for myself the capabilities of this 3-in-1 garden tool.  I was especially interested in the sifting aspect of this tool, as when I rake the leaves in my yard, I will usually rake up quite a bit of my sandy soil. 

When I received my Golden Gark, I removed it from the box to discover it needed to be assembled.  However, the assembly process took only a few minutes following the enclosed instructions. I attached both the D-handle to the shaft, as well as the tray with the enclosed screws, rings and screw covers.

PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS 

·         Working blade made from high quality polycarbonate

·         Aluminum shaft which is powder coated

·         Comfortable D-grip made from polypropylene

·         Lightweight – weighing only 1.76 pounds

·         Ergonomic and very strong

·         Overall length is 62”

·         Tine dimensions: 8 ½” long by 14 ¼” wide 

I have a lot of trees in my backyard, and even if I raked daily, I still could not keep up, as the task is so overwhelming.  Now, I have several rakes in my shed, including a few leaf rakes and a couple garden rakes.  One of my leaf rakes covers a large area, but the problem with that is it has plastic tines and doesn’t handle any weight of any substance.  Consequently, my favorite, prior to receiving the Golden Gark, was a metal tined rake, which covered a smaller area.  The problem with using this rake, although it allows me to get under bushes and tighter spaces, it doesn’t hold the weight that I would like, nor does it really sift out the soil.  However, the Golden Gark has definitely made the chore of raking my leaves much easier on my back. 

As you can see my soil is quite sandy, but using the Golden Gark, I was able to collect the leaves with little difficulty as I sifted out the “soil”.  There were a few instances where I encountered a bit of difficulty because of some weeds in my yard. However, by simply pushing a little on the Golden Gark, I was able to use it in place of a shovel to gather the leaves and other little presents my dog leaves in the back yard. 

I love the fact that you don’t have to bend over using this tool.  After you scoop up your leaves, all you need do is to twist your hand to empty the Golden Gark into your yard waste container. 

Talk about strong, the Golden Gark was able to handle everything that I threw at it, including some rocks that were mixed in with the leaves.  Overall, I was very impressed with the Golden Gark.  Using this tool, I was able to conduct my yard work in less than half the time that it would normally take.  But, the best feature of this tool is that you can scoop up your leaves, and other materials without having to bend over and since I have back problems anyway, any help in this regard is appreciated.  Be sure to check out the variety of uses for this tool on the company’s website.

With a trusted name like Root Assassin, you can expect the company to stand by their products, and they do.  If, for an reason you are not satisfied with your purchase, they will replace the item free of charge within 1 year of purchase.

The Golden Gark can be purchased directly from Root Assassin for $44.99.  While this price might seem a bit more expensive initially, considering the fact that the Golden Gark can take the place of 3 tools, the investment is quite reasonable.

You can find the Golden Gark on the Root Assassin’s social media pages, also:  Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, andYou Tube.

If you do any gardening or landscaping at all, I recommend you get a Golden Gark to make your gardening and landscaping more enjoyable, quicker and easier.  The Golden Gark makes a great gift for your closest gardener or landscaper, as well.  Be sure to order your Golden Gark today.

 

Review Source: http://www.jennsblahblahblog.com/meet-golden-gark-root-assassin/

Author Name: JENN

One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Nevertheless, I was skeptical. All my life I’ve gardened in dense clay soil, and my current garden is on a rocky ridge where I deal with both clay and stones. I doubted even this aggressive-looking shovel would be up to the challenging task.

pruning branches with Root Assassin

While slightly cumbersome to wield, the shovel did indeed saw through branches, even thick ones.

The video on the company’s website shows the shovel being used as a saw to cut through limbs as well as delving in the ground, cutting effortlessly through turf, and slicing through pesky roots with a single swipe. Again, I was skeptical. Would this shovel really work in the real world? Is this truly “Super Shovel,” coming to the rescue of gardeners who battle with roots and rocks and difficult soil? Can it do all that and prune branches?

Pruning Branches

penetrating turf with Root Assassin shovel

I casually stuck the blade into the grass to stand it up, and was surprised how easily it sunk deeply into the turf – deeper than shown in this photograph.

First I tried it as a saw to prune branches. While it was a little awkward to use a shovel to cut through wood, and it wasn’t as efficient as a bow saw, it worked. If you’re digging in the garden with your Root Assassin shovel and see a branch that needs trimming, you can deal with it right away, saving yourself a hike to the tool shed or garage to get another tool.

Penetrating Turf

digging thru roots with Root Assassin shovel

When you encounter a root, continue to dig and pull up against the intruding fibers. The shovel sliced through them with ease, making digging easy.

It was startling how easily The Root Assassin cut through turf, slicing through the thick mass of roots like a hot knife through soft butter. Clearly this is the tool you want if you’re planting in grass. The pointed tip, designed to penetrate through tough soil, would allow you to cut the perfect diameter holes for planting bulbs such as crocus or spring star flowers (Ipheon) in the lawn, and digging holes for trees or shrubs would be a snap.

Unfortunately, the pointed tip and slight curve of the blade makes the shovel unsuitable for edging, as it would be very difficult to cut a straight, sharp line. On the flip side, this is a superb tool for cutting deep and narrow trenches, so while the Root Assassin shovel can successfully multitask, it cannot – and should not be expected to – do everything.

Digging and Cutting Through Roots

long Root Assassin shovel

It would have been a little easier for me to dig with the Root Assassin if I were taller.

The Root Assassin also lived up to its claim as a root eater. We tackled a dead shrub that needed removing, so it didn’t take long to encounter roots of significant girth. A little sawing accompanied by continued digging, and each root was easily severed. The shovel worked like a charm, making a potentially challenging job much, much easier.

Ease of Use

handle on Root Assassin shovel

The padded handle is easy to grip and comfortable.

The solid steel shovel stands 4 feet tall. The narrow, commercial grade 14-gauge steel pointed blade represents at least 12” of that length. At 5’3” tall, I found getting my foot firmly on the step in a position where I could put my weight and strength onto the blade for digging was a bit like climbing onto stilts. However, my 6”4” tall husband had no problem whatsoever. It would be nice if the shovel came in different sizes: large, medium and small – or tall, mid-height, and short.

The handgrip is comfortably wide, accommodating large or small hands, and is made of reinforced rubber that is both durable and slip-proof.

foot step on Root Assassin shovel

The manufacturers claim the step is angled, but I didn’t notice that. However, I’m sure it didn’t matter one way or the other.

The manufacturers claim the step is forward turned for secure foot placement, but I couldn’t see it. To my eye it looked almost perfectly parallel to the ground if the shovel is held straight upright.

Specifications and Features

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Commercial grade carbon steel 14-gauge blade
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip, reinforced rubber handle for added leverage and control
  • Weighs 4 pounds
  • Retails for $59.99

Recommendation

5 Shovels Rating from Gardening Products ReviewOften hybrid tools end up doing neither job well. The Root Assassin is a happy exception. If you are digging a hole in a root-infested area, this is the perfect tool. While I would not pick up this tool simply to cut off a branch, if it’s in my hand when a branch for cutting presents itself, it will do the job effectively.

The Root Assassin Shovel lives up to its name, and to the claims made by the manufacturer. I highly recommend it.

The company can be reached online through their website www.Rootassassinshovel.com. The Root Assassin is a patented all-purpose garden shovel and saw.

Where to Buy

The Root Assassin shovel is available directly from the manufacturer or through Amazon. The retail price is $59.99 at either location, plus shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

At the end of each year, the Gardening Products Review takes a close look at all of the products we’ve reviewed that year. We then award up to five products with the Golden Shovel Award for outstanding garden product.

In 2014, we had a lot a fabulous products to choose from, including some new introductions, as well as some that have been around the block a few times. Our reviewers weighed in with their favorites and we also heard from many of our readers. We revisited some of the products that we reviewed earlier in the year, checked how well products were holding up after extended use, and looked at which items got the most use from our testers and home gardeners.

After weighing the pros and cons of all of the gardening products, we’re proud to announce the 2014 winners of the Golden Shovel Awards!

2014 Golden Shovel Award Winners – Editor’s Choice

 

Review of Bear Wallow rose gauntlet glovesBear Wallow Gloves Rose Gauntlets – At first glance, these gauntlet-style gloves look like a pair of regular leather gardening gloves with a sleeve sewn on. Kind of a home-made look (which makes sense – they’re hand-made right here in the USA). But don’t let that fool you – these are hands down the absolute best pair of gardening gloves I’ve ever used for pruning roses..

 

HERShovel-featuredHERShovel Ergonomic Shovel for Women – HERS® is a hybrid tool that combines the features of both shovel and spade, designed with women’s bodies, height, and digging style in mind. Women will find that it offers lighter weight, improved leverage, and larger capacity than most shovels.

 

 

Root Assassin shovel reviewRoot Assassin Shovel – One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Often hybrid tools end up doing neither job well but this easy-to-use shovel not only cuts easily through root-infested soil, it also prunes branches and sinks into turf easily.

 

 

Spear Head Spade reviewSpear Head Spade – This precision digging tool combines some of the best characteristics of a spade with a garden axe or knife. Lightweight yet sturdy, it makes quick work of a wide range of garden tasks. It is a great addition to the tool shed—but not a replacement for other shovels. What it does, it does much, much better than less specialized digging tools.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/2014-golden-shovel-awards-best-gardening-product/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

+ Smarter Hobby

if you work with the ground at all, you know the importance of a good shovel. With an ordinary shovel, you have to put a lot of weight on it to even crack the ground sometimes, let alone dig a good-size hole. But with a great shovel like the Root Assassin, it feels like you’re slicing butter.

The Root Assassin shovel is one tool a metal detectorist may want to consider adding to his arsenal.

The company was kind enough to send us their digger to review. Here’s what we think:​

Why Is the Root Assassin Good for Detectorists?

As metal detectorists, we’re sunk if we don’t have a great shovel by our side.

Without the right shovel, you’ll never be able to dig deep enough in tough ground to reach our targets, especially if there are tree roots or gravel involved.

And if we can’t dig deep enough, it doesn’t matter that we’ve found great targets — we’ll never be able to unearth them.

Plus, if you fatigue yourself just by digging a few targets, you’re not going to detect as long as you would if you weren’t tired.

The more time you spend out there detecting, the better your odds of making that once-in-a-lifetime discovery. And isn’t that what every detectorist dreams about?

The Root Assassin is a heavy-duty shovel made for tough roots. That’s important for detectorists, especially if they like to search by big, old trees.

I’ve had great success looking by old trees that I imagine were used as shade back in the day by people looking for a place to escape the summer heat.

I’ve found jewelry, coins, gold-plated lift-arm lighters and a lot of old toy cars, ships and helicopters by shade trees. And let me tell you, it wasn’t easy.

I was in a battle with a lot of thick, tough roots that were protecting all the signals I was trying to reach.

The only thing that saved me was using a shovel with serrated teeth.

When there are roots involved, shovels with serrated teeth, like the Root Assassin, will help you recover targets quickly and with less effort than a traditional shovel.

Features

The best feature on this shovel is the 16 serrated teeth that are found on each side.

Here is what is unique about these teeth — they cut while digging in and when you pull your shovel out.

That double action makes quick work of the root you’re trying to cut and get out of your way.

The teeth also help when you’re searching in heavy clay soil that is a pain to dig with a traditional shovel.

The other great thing about this shovel is how easy it is to lift and carry around with you.

It only weighs 4 pounds.

As a detectorist, you’re going to be lugging around a lot of equipment already, especially if you’re doing a day-long hunt in a remote area.

You’ll already be carrying your detector, a pinpointer, your treasure bag, plus any water, food, bug spray and sunblock you take with you on an extended hunt.

The last thing you need is a heavy shovel to take with you.

Because this shovel doesn’t weigh much, you’ll be able to take it with you and use it for hours without feeling exhausted and calling it a day early.

It cuts a neat plug, which is crucial as a detectorist.

Whether you’re hunting at a public place like a park or you’ve been granted special permission to detect on private property, you don’t want to earn a reputation as a detectorist who tears up the property he searches.

If you don’t learn how to cut a neat plug, word will spread and fewer people will be willing to let you search their grounds.

The Root Assassin is made of steel which is then treated with a silver powder coat paint.

Since it’s made of strong material, it should be durable. If you do have any issues with the durability, however, the company offers a 100 percent replacement guarantee.

The guarantee lasts for one year and will be honored with no questions asked.

This shovel has a grip on the handle, which makes it comfortable to use and easier on the hands.

Because the head of this shovel is so narrow, you won’t have to cut a huge plug to reach a small target.

If you are good at pinpointing your target, you’ll be able to cut a small plug once you’ve zeroed in on where the signal is coming from.

The length of the blade on this shovel is good for metal detecting.

You’ll be able to cut plugs at up to a foot at a time, which is as deep as most smaller targets are found from the large majority of amateur metal detectors.

The Mini Root Assassin

If a full-size, 4-pound shovel is still too much weight for you to lug around, you may want to consider using the Mini Root Assassin.

Check latest pricing here for the mini version.​

It works using the same method as the full-size shovel, with the serrated teeth that work in both directions.

But the Mini Root Assassin is a lighter, shorter option at 2.2 pounds.

If you don’t have much upper body strength or you want to conserve your energy for longer detecting sessions, you might want to go with the Mini.

It’s also a good pick for shorter detectorists who have problems wielding a longer shovel.

And it goes without saying that a smaller digging tool is always preferred when hunting in public areas or small residential yards. See our responsible metal detecting guide here.​

Wrapping Up

In addition to your metal detector, a good shovel is a key part of your success as a detectorist.

You’ll need to find a heavy-duty option that is light enough that you’ll be able to hunt day after day with minimal soreness in your arms and back.

No matter which shovel you decided to go with, remember to always fill in your plugs and be a responsible detectorist.

The kinder we are to the ground we search, the more rights we’ll keep as detectorists.

 

Review source: https://www.smarterhobby.com/metal-detecting/root-assassin-shovel-review/
Author name: Mark Orwig

+ Raise Your Garden

Move over Jason Bourne. There’s a new assassin in town. And we’re still after the bad guys. Except this time, we’re dealing with weeds, roots, and branches. It’s called the Root Assassin and it’s ready to tackle those weeds, dig up deep roots and slash that branch. You’ll love this slender, rigid tool with serrated teeth for tons of tasks. I have lots of yard to do this fall and like different tools for various jobs. It all depends. But what makes the Root Assassin completely unique? It’s the shovel/saw combo. Never seen the like of it before! It has never occurred to me to use a shovel to saw with. Until now. So I’m thrilled that there are two winners who will get their very own Root Assassin valued at $55. To enter, like the Raise Your Garden Facebook page andshare this post or sign up for our newsletter. For two entries, do both. Let us know you entered by telling us something fun about yourself in the comment section of this post!

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First impressions of the Root Assassin

So there are times my brain tells me it’s okay to nag Tom to do tasks that I really, really don’t want to do. This is especially true when it comes to yard work that requires any upper body strength as I have zero. I’m just not very big. To give Tom credit, he’d help me in my perennial beds, but I’ve declined his help because he doesn’t know where my plants are. He just hacks at everything. Loosing perennials in this way is sad. I still miss my Japanese iris.

And I think I told you we bought my Grandma’s house several years ago? And with it, I inherited her perennial beds with plants. The problem is, over the years of neglect, they got overgrown. Unmanageable. Trees got embedded in there. Shrubs got overgrown. Thick brush took over. Weeds became so strong that they uprooted all else in their path.

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Enter: Root Assassin Shovel. Just now I was working until dark hammering away at a few super roots that had taken over my side perennial bed. For years, they remained there because no ordinary shovel that I could maneuver would be up for the task. Bu-bye roots. I actually got them out myself without Tom’s help. It was pretty easy. Those serrated teeth really hacked away. I just have to double check that I got all of the root out so it doesn’t come back stronger than ever. But that’s a success story!

But be careful! This tool is super sharp which is why it is able to chop branches. But that was my next task. Would it easily slice through a branch? That was the test the Root Assassin would have to pass. Quick answer. Yep. It worked. I hardly knew what to expect. I mean, one hardly expects a shovel to be a saw.

And that’s what so great about the Root Assassin Shovel. The typical saw doesn’t have a handle on it. I always fear that I’m going to saw my fingers off! The long handle gives you some distance from the object you are sawing. The red grippy handle also gives you something to grasp with force.

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Product rundown

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Industrial grade 14-gauge blade
  • Made of solid structural carbon steel and is overlaid with a sleek silver color powder coat
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip for added leverage and control
  • Red handle means you can find when you left it in the garden before the rain comes
  • Steel shaft is topped with durable solid rubber coated bright red handle
  • Weighs 4 pounds

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Ways to use this tool – Think outside the box

  • Trim and prune plants and trees
  • Cut branches still on the tree or on the ground
  • Dig out deep, deep roots – super roots I call them!
  • Edge your lawn
  • Dealing with thick brush
  • Transplant your “big plants” like shrubs or gigantic hostas
  • Landscaping
  • Metal Detecting tool
  • Plant your bulbs deep so the squirrels don’t eat them
  • Take with you on your next camping trip
  • Saw off your Brussel Sprouts from the plant. It worked great for this odd purpose!
  • Terrify intruders to your home. I mean, this tool is fierce. Those serrated teeth will surely scare the bad people away. Just keep under your bed at night. (I’m not kidding!)

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Last thoughts….

It was great hearing Tom shout out the other day “where’s the Root Assassin?” This means he’s going to get a job done. And a dirty shovel is one that is being used! It was intriguing that I found myself sawing away at branches, not because that was a chore that needed to get done, but rather for the fun of it. Just because I can!

And yes, I’ve endorsed other shovels on this site, but certainly not one that can slice through thick, woody branches. That’s just fierce. So it’s about having the right tool for the job. Each has a place. It’s kind of like when you sit down to dinner and you choose between using a fork or a spoon. Some choices are easy. Soup = spoon. Spaghetti = fork. But what about a thick pot roast with a gravy? You might choose both. It’s the same with with shovels and spades. At times you choose one over the over, other times, you’ll use both on the job.

 

Review source: http://www.raiseyourgarden.com/home/saw-away-with-the-root-assassin-shovel-two-winner-giveaway

+ Wisconsin Garden

+ The Garden Swap

Well built sturdy shovel that performed well.

In my original review I listed a con as the price. Recently I was looking at some garden spades and was surprised to see the price of these. Considering the Root Assassin is built much better than any spade I could find, the price really isn’t bad.

The Root Assassin Shovel lived up to its name in a trial in my vegetable garden. Preparing my raised beds for spring planting was easily accomplished as the Root Assassin cut through roots left by last year’s crop, cover crops and invading tree roots.

Roots up to 1 inch or more were so easily cut I barely noticed they were there.

On one raised bed all I did was turn the soil to a depth of about 1 1/2 shovel lengths. After raking the bed smoothed I just hand picked the root pieces that were left on top.

For the second raised bed I dug out some of the soil and sifted it. The Root Assasin did will in the actual digging but it may not have been as good as a standard shovel had my (sandy) soil been very dry.

Just to put the Root Assassin through some of its paces I tried digging a small hole near a tree stump.

The Root Assassin cut through the smaller roots with ease. When I hit the 2″-4″ root it took a little practice to get the shovel to cut. It didn’t take me long to learn and the root was cut within minutes.

One thing though, do not expect to get a straight cut. At least not for me.

My centipede grass has grown well onto my sidewalks as we were not living in the home for about 9 months and the maintenance was let go. I tested the Root Assassin Shovel on edging along my side walk. It cut through the thick mat of grass and roots with no effort. I’ll be finishing this chore at a later time but I will follow up using a week trimmer since the slight  curve of the blade on the Root Assassin does not make a neat straight line.

I did not attemtp to trim any tree branches with the Root Assassin Shovel and don’t think this would be my tool of choice for the chore.

Pros:

  • Strong
  • Well built
  • Cuts roots and grass easily

Cons:

Price – The price plus shipping are little high but product is still worth it if you’ve got root and grass problems.

Recommendations:

I would definetly recommend the Root Assassin Shovel.

 

Review Source: http://thegardenswap.com/rootassassinreview.aspx/
Author name: Wayne Schaefer

+ Miss Smarty Plants

Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel

As I sit down to write this, I am pondering two possible titles, “Testing Out the Root Assassin Shovel” or “My New Favorite Shovel.” Hmmm. When the folks from the Root Assassin sent me a shovel to test for this review I was initially skeptical. It is kind of a crazy looking thing!  Almost like an alligator, chainsaw, and shovel had a baby.

 

I was waiting for the perfect project to give the Root Assassin a project it deserved. I mean you can’t use something called the Root Assassin to plant pansies!  We are working on a major yard renovation and I knew this would be the perfect opportunity. My dad came to town and we were cutting down trees, removing palms and getting busy on our projects. We removed a 25′ tall viburnum from the corner of the shed and this gave us two opportunities to test out the Root Assassin.

The first project was for digging and transplanting this large bromeliad. As you can see, the roots of the viburnum were intertwined with the bromeliad, yet we wanted to try to keep as large of a root ball as possible. We tied up the plant (the serrated edges of the bromeliad will really tear into your legs!), and I started working my way around with the Root Assassin. It was a breeze. The upper edges of the shovel have a reinforced edge to use your foot for extra push and it took less that three minutes to pop this plant out of the ground.

 

Once the viburnum was cut down it left our shed extremely visible and in need of a little more cover. I’ve been plant lusting for a Japanese Fern Tree, Filicium decipiens, for a few years but didn’t have anywhere to plant it until now. But of course I wanted to plant it approximately one foot from the trunk of the previous viburnums. If this was a small plant it may not have been much of an issue, but this plant was in a 30 gallon container almost  30″ in diameter and needed a large hole.

This is where the Root Assassin really shines. Using the shovel in a sawing motion takes some getting used to, but it very quickly cuts through large roots in the ground.  I think I could have been at this project for a long time if I hadn’t been using this shovel. I used the Root Assassin to cut large roots, some up to 2″ in diameter, and clear the hole without too much of a problem. In fact, because March Madness was on tv, I actually did this during halftime of the Iowa basketball game!

Overall the shovel is very light and just the right length for using the handle for leverage and also getting in tight areas. I have a bad habit of kind of using my shovels like crowbars to pry out plants and while my other shovels creak and grown (and will surely snap one day) the Root Assassin stood strong. And while this might sound like a trivial point, the red handle makes it easy to find too!

Root Assassin Shovel

 

 

If I have any criticism of the Root Assassin shovel it would be that I am a little afraid I will cut through an irrigation pipe with it!  My regular shovels won’t hurt these pipes, but when I get into the sawing motion with the Root Assassin I have a feeling I could cut through some pvc without even realizing it. I do take some care when I know I am near these pipes and haven’t had any issues yet.

Our next trial for the Root Assassin was to dig a large hole through established perennial peanut groundcover. By this point my dad and I were arguing over who got to use the Root Assassin and who had to use the “regular” shovel.   In my dad’s words, “Boy, that shovel really cuts through.”  Who would have thought he would be a converted fan too?

If you’ve ever tried to plant anything in an established bed of perennial peanut you probably found that the hardest part is cutting through the tough, wiry stems and roots. The Root Assassin did a great job for this task. We used the Root Assassin in a sawing motion to dig the perimeter and then remove the roots. Once that was cleared it was easier to use a regular spade to remove the sandy soil and dig to the depth for the new palm.

 

As our yard renovations continue it is a constant argument over which one of us gets to use the Root Assassin. If you are constantly battling roots and tough digging conditions I would recommend the Root Assassin. As the name so boldly states, it will tear through the toughest of soils and roots to make digging, transplanting or any garden work a pleasure. You can find more information on the Root Assassin through their website.

While I did receive a complimentary Root Assassin Shovel, the opinions provided here are my own. And yes, I would purchase one again.

 

Review source: http://misssmartyplants.com/root-assassin/
Author name: Keri Byrum

+ Garden Bunch

 

Review: I currently own several shovels, one for all purpose digging, and one for spading earth. Both work fine, and have held up for years to the basic needs of my gardening tasks.


deep into the clay. It also did great at digging up the rocks, based mostly on the more triangular shape of the blade. The blade is 2” wide at the digging end, 16 ½” long, and 6” wide at the top, with slight edges on top for to leverage with your foot when digging.

When it came to chopping up larger clods of soil, just turn it on it’s side and use the serrated edges. It made light work of this step.

This shovel only weighs 4 lbs, so was easy for me to use. I’m only 5’ 2”, so thought it might be a bit tall for me, but I really didn’t have any issues with the length, especially after inserting into the ground. I also love that it’s all metal with a heavy plastic handle, and easy to hose off when I was done with it.


This is honestly my new favorite shovel. I’m super happy with it, and highly recommend you give it a try in your own garden. I think it will become one of your “go to” tools! think it will become one of your “go to” tools!

 

Review Source: http://gardenbunch.com/product-reviews/root-assassin-shovel-and-saw/
Review by ChristineGB

+ Gardening Products Review

Ah, The Netherlands, home of windmills, tulips, wooden shoes,…and the Golden Gark rake. If you’re like me, you want to know what the hashtag is a gark? Urban dictionary informed me that a gark is “a universal word that can be substituted to mean anything you want it to be” and can be used as a noun, verb, adjective, etc. Perhaps that’s why The Golden Gark (distributed by The Root Assassin—“Unique Garden Tools That Work”) is promoted as a 3-in-1 tool: rake, shovel, and sifter. In other words, the Golden Gark can be anything you want it to be. But does it live up to its hip hype?

SPECIFICATIONS

Weight: 1.76 pounds
Shipping Weight: 3.75 pounds
Overall Length: 62”
Materials: 20 polycarbonate tines; plastic D handle; powder-coated aluminum shaft.
Tine dimensions: 8 ½” long, 14 ¼” wide
Warranty: 1 year free-of-charge replacement (not refund)

MINIMAL ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

Lifting the BIG cardboard box from my front door, I thought the shipping company had inadvertently mailed me an empty box! For the size of the box, it was shockingly lightweight.

When I opened it, my amusement continued. Here’s this featherweight product next to a shipping label with such menacing words: ROOT ASSASSIN.

The Gold Gark Pack

At first glance, I was underwhelmed.

I spent more time looking for a screwdriver than I did assembling the tool. Within 3 minutes, tool in hand, I headed outside to put it through some paces.

One screw attaches the comfortable D-handle for the shaft.

Two screws fix the head to the shaft. Plastic caps cover the tops of the screws.

A GARK BY ANY OTHER NAME…

While the Golden Gark claims to serve as a rake, shovel, and sifter, I got hung up on just the word “rake.” When I think of a rake, I think of three very different tools in my shed that I use each year: a leaf rake, a steel rake (aka, bow, common, or garden variety), and a dethatching rake. Let me say upfront that I will not be able to replace all three of these rakes with the Golden Gark. The polycarbonate tines lack the weight and rigidity to dethatch your grass. Nor will I use this in the place of a single shovel. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Besides, even given those limitations, I couldn’t help but love this little tool. Read why.

the Golden Gark

Can the Golden Gark replace all of these tools? Well…read on.

I tested the Golden Gark to see how it would perform 4 functions:

  • A leaf rake
  • A garden rake
  • A shovel
  • A sifter

Test 1: A leaf rake

North Carolina might proclaim First in Flight on its license plates, but I think it could also be called the Most Leafy state. I could rake leaves from October until May and still not get them all.

My traditional leaf rake with molded-plastic tines covers 32” of ground with each sweep. The problem is, that big size tempts me to overload it until the spine joining the tines to the head cracks. I go through at least two of these rakes each season. Those spineless tines lack the strength to clear away half of the leaves in their path. The straight shaft of the old-fashioned leaf rake presents a second problem: it encourages over-reaching and unnecessary bending. I already have back pain; I’m not looking for more.

How would the Golden Gark stand up to the leaves in my yard? And how would my back hold up? I held it tine-side down like a conventional leaf rake. The slightly bent angle of the shaft exerts natural pressure on the ground from the 20 tines. A couple of gentle pulls across the ground, and the ground became leaf-free.

The Golden Gark covers less than half of the ground of my traditional plastic rake, around 14”. That smaller head size, coupled with the polycarbonate tines, creates great flexibility and strength. And the bent shaft allowed me to work from an upright position, meaning no back strain.

As a leaf rake, I loved it! Best leaf rake I’ve ever used.

Test 2: A garden rake

I often use my leaf and garden rakes to clear hedge clippings. The oversized head on leaf rakes snags on still-attached branches, and it can’t fit between the hedges to clear away clippings. While metal garden rakes don’t get snagged, they tend to displace mulch on the ground that I want to stay put.

Having recently trimmed my hedges, I put the rake on task to clear cut branches from the hedges and surrounding ground. The light weight made it easy to lift my arms above my head to clear away cut segments from the tops of the hedges, and the small head size made it easy to maneuver between hedges.

The GG left my mulch behind but allowed me to rake up and then scoop out trimmings.

Flipping the tool like a scoop (which is a better description than “shovel”), I pushed it along the ground where it had no problem getting under pine cones, needles, twigs, Sweet Gum balls, etc. Normally, I use a garden rake to take on this sort of debris. The strong, metal tines stand up to anything I’m strong enough to pull; however, the short tines mean it clogs up quickly and has to be cleaned out.

In no time, I created a neat pile. Like with my metal rake, the tines became clogged with pine cones and Sweet Gum balls, but not as quickly.

One thing I can’t do with the Golden Gark that I can do with my metal garden rake is feed a fire. A couple of times each year, I burn twigs and branches in my fire pit. Sticking the polycarbonate head of the rake into the fire would be bad for the rake…and the environment.

Even though this tool can’t stand the heat of a fire, I really liked it as a garden rake.

Using it as a scoop, it skims the ground picking up pine cones and sweet gum balls with ease.

Test 3: A shovel

Golden Gark claims it’s a 3:1 tool, doing the work of a rake, shovel, and sifter. As I mentioned earlier, I like the term “scoop” instead of “shovel.” Why? You will not be digging holes in your yard or loading gravel into a wheelbarrow using the Golden Gark as a shovel. It’s not that kind of shovel. But you can push leaves, pine cones, and debris into a pile with ease. That’s a scoop. From there, you can scoop debris into a trash can or wheelbarrow. I’ll bet you could use this as a snow scoop, too.

It’s not a hoe, but it removed fast-growing spring weeds by the roots.

Standing upright, I pushed the pile of material 5 feet away to the edge of the woods. I’ve broken quite a few plastic leaf rakes doing this same thing. But this time, nothing broke! And because of its light weight, I cleared a large patch of ground quickly and with no fatigue.

Eying the pile of double-ground mulch in my backyard, I wondered how it would hold up to something heavier. Using a combination of pushing like a shovel and pulling like a rake, I quickly spread two yards. The light weight came in handy again. I didn’t get tired. No, you can’t lift up a scoopful of mulch with the Golden Gark, but the design makes it easy to push it along the ground to dump it into place.

As an added bonus, running the tool along the ground as a scoop pulled short-rooted spring weeds up like magic.

As a shovel (again, scoop!) tasked with moving piles of garden debris, I liked the Golden Gark.

Test 4: A sifter

My wife recently hoed and turned our raised garden beds. Flipping the rake around as a shovel, I scooped up a section of earth and shook it from side-to-side. Sure enough, the non-compacted soil fell through the tines, and I was left with a scoop of balled up dirt and rocks. It reminded me of cleaning out a litter box, something I have too much experience doing.

The GG easily sifts out topsoil from rocks, dirt clods, and weeds.

A few days later, I tried the Golden Gark as a pond skimmer. Full-disclosure: I haven’t cleaned my pond for a couple of years, ever since the pump died. Or maybe that’s why the pump died. Either way, my pond held equal parts of scum and water. To get it running again, I needed to clean out the muck. Skimming the top of the pond, I quickly filtered off the layer of floating debris. Then I flipped it around to scoop from the bottom.

The GG excels as a pond cleaner/skimmer.

 

It’s mean on filth, but gentle on liners and pond wildlife

Did I mention it’s been a few years since I cleaned out my pond? Several inches of sludge sat at the bottom. The tines sagged and bent under the weight of filth. Instead of lifting it out, I slid the scoop across the bottom of the pond—without damaging the liner—and slipped the full rake out. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, “Why lift when you can slide?” The Garden Gark proved much more efficient than my little net skimmer and much safer on the liner than a shovel!

As a sifter/strainer/pond cleaner, I loved the Golden Gark.

WARRANTY

Golden Gark

Strong yet flexible, meaning the GG springs back from abuse

Root Assassin LLC stands by every product they sell. If for any reason you are not satisfied with your purchase, they will replace the item free of charge within 1 year of purchase.

RECOMMENDATION

The Golden Gark costs more than your ordinary plastic leaf rake ($19 to $33), your garden variety—pun intended—metal garden rake ($20 to $45), or your typical pond skimmer ($18 to $30). But having tested it rigorously, my search for a leaf (and medium duty garden rake) and pond skimmer that will last longer than one season is over!

WHERE TO BUY

You can purchase the Golden Gark for $44.99 directly from Root Assassin or $49.99 with Amazon Prime membership with free next day shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/golden-gark-rake-review/

Author Name: Scott Carbonara

+ Jenns Blah Blah Blog

Meet the Golden Gark from Root Assassin

Okay, you ask what in the world is a “Gark” and why do you need one?  I went online to find the meaning of a gark.  I searched several dictionaries and finally discovered at the urbandictionary.com site that “the word is a universal word that can be substituted to mean anything you want it to be whether you want to use it as a noun, verb, or adjective.”  So, take a gander of the Golden Gark from Root Assassin.

Meet the Golden Gark from Root Assassin

Actually, in this case, the Golden Gark is an excellent gardening tool from the Netherlands.  This multifunctional tool combines raking, shoveling and sifting functions to be used in your garden, backyard or stable.  Clean your backyard from leaves and all other dirt with the Gark.

 

Thank you Root Assassin for providing me with a Golden Gark for the purpose of this review.  

I was intrigued when I first saw the Golden Gark.  I had to find out for myself the capabilities of this 3-in-1 garden tool.  I was especially interested in the sifting aspect of this tool, as when I rake the leaves in my yard, I will usually rake up quite a bit of my sandy soil. 

When I received my Golden Gark, I removed it from the box to discover it needed to be assembled.  However, the assembly process took only a few minutes following the enclosed instructions. I attached both the D-handle to the shaft, as well as the tray with the enclosed screws, rings and screw covers.

PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS 

·         Working blade made from high quality polycarbonate

·         Aluminum shaft which is powder coated

·         Comfortable D-grip made from polypropylene

·         Lightweight – weighing only 1.76 pounds

·         Ergonomic and very strong

·         Overall length is 62”

·         Tine dimensions: 8 ½” long by 14 ¼” wide 

I have a lot of trees in my backyard, and even if I raked daily, I still could not keep up, as the task is so overwhelming.  Now, I have several rakes in my shed, including a few leaf rakes and a couple garden rakes.  One of my leaf rakes covers a large area, but the problem with that is it has plastic tines and doesn’t handle any weight of any substance.  Consequently, my favorite, prior to receiving the Golden Gark, was a metal tined rake, which covered a smaller area.  The problem with using this rake, although it allows me to get under bushes and tighter spaces, it doesn’t hold the weight that I would like, nor does it really sift out the soil.  However, the Golden Gark has definitely made the chore of raking my leaves much easier on my back. 

As you can see my soil is quite sandy, but using the Golden Gark, I was able to collect the leaves with little difficulty as I sifted out the “soil”.  There were a few instances where I encountered a bit of difficulty because of some weeds in my yard. However, by simply pushing a little on the Golden Gark, I was able to use it in place of a shovel to gather the leaves and other little presents my dog leaves in the back yard. 

I love the fact that you don’t have to bend over using this tool.  After you scoop up your leaves, all you need do is to twist your hand to empty the Golden Gark into your yard waste container. 

Talk about strong, the Golden Gark was able to handle everything that I threw at it, including some rocks that were mixed in with the leaves.  Overall, I was very impressed with the Golden Gark.  Using this tool, I was able to conduct my yard work in less than half the time that it would normally take.  But, the best feature of this tool is that you can scoop up your leaves, and other materials without having to bend over and since I have back problems anyway, any help in this regard is appreciated.  Be sure to check out the variety of uses for this tool on the company’s website.

With a trusted name like Root Assassin, you can expect the company to stand by their products, and they do.  If, for an reason you are not satisfied with your purchase, they will replace the item free of charge within 1 year of purchase.

The Golden Gark can be purchased directly from Root Assassin for $44.99.  While this price might seem a bit more expensive initially, considering the fact that the Golden Gark can take the place of 3 tools, the investment is quite reasonable.

You can find the Golden Gark on the Root Assassin’s social media pages, also:  Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, andYou Tube.

If you do any gardening or landscaping at all, I recommend you get a Golden Gark to make your gardening and landscaping more enjoyable, quicker and easier.  The Golden Gark makes a great gift for your closest gardener or landscaper, as well.  Be sure to order your Golden Gark today.

 

Review Source: http://www.jennsblahblahblog.com/meet-golden-gark-root-assassin/

Author Name: JENN

+ Gardening Products Review

One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Nevertheless, I was skeptical. All my life I’ve gardened in dense clay soil, and my current garden is on a rocky ridge where I deal with both clay and stones. I doubted even this aggressive-looking shovel would be up to the challenging task.

pruning branches with Root Assassin

While slightly cumbersome to wield, the shovel did indeed saw through branches, even thick ones.

The video on the company’s website shows the shovel being used as a saw to cut through limbs as well as delving in the ground, cutting effortlessly through turf, and slicing through pesky roots with a single swipe. Again, I was skeptical. Would this shovel really work in the real world? Is this truly “Super Shovel,” coming to the rescue of gardeners who battle with roots and rocks and difficult soil? Can it do all that and prune branches?

Pruning Branches

penetrating turf with Root Assassin shovel

I casually stuck the blade into the grass to stand it up, and was surprised how easily it sunk deeply into the turf – deeper than shown in this photograph.

First I tried it as a saw to prune branches. While it was a little awkward to use a shovel to cut through wood, and it wasn’t as efficient as a bow saw, it worked. If you’re digging in the garden with your Root Assassin shovel and see a branch that needs trimming, you can deal with it right away, saving yourself a hike to the tool shed or garage to get another tool.

Penetrating Turf

digging thru roots with Root Assassin shovel

When you encounter a root, continue to dig and pull up against the intruding fibers. The shovel sliced through them with ease, making digging easy.

It was startling how easily The Root Assassin cut through turf, slicing through the thick mass of roots like a hot knife through soft butter. Clearly this is the tool you want if you’re planting in grass. The pointed tip, designed to penetrate through tough soil, would allow you to cut the perfect diameter holes for planting bulbs such as crocus or spring star flowers (Ipheon) in the lawn, and digging holes for trees or shrubs would be a snap.

Unfortunately, the pointed tip and slight curve of the blade makes the shovel unsuitable for edging, as it would be very difficult to cut a straight, sharp line. On the flip side, this is a superb tool for cutting deep and narrow trenches, so while the Root Assassin shovel can successfully multitask, it cannot – and should not be expected to – do everything.

Digging and Cutting Through Roots

long Root Assassin shovel

It would have been a little easier for me to dig with the Root Assassin if I were taller.

The Root Assassin also lived up to its claim as a root eater. We tackled a dead shrub that needed removing, so it didn’t take long to encounter roots of significant girth. A little sawing accompanied by continued digging, and each root was easily severed. The shovel worked like a charm, making a potentially challenging job much, much easier.

Ease of Use

handle on Root Assassin shovel

The padded handle is easy to grip and comfortable.

The solid steel shovel stands 4 feet tall. The narrow, commercial grade 14-gauge steel pointed blade represents at least 12” of that length. At 5’3” tall, I found getting my foot firmly on the step in a position where I could put my weight and strength onto the blade for digging was a bit like climbing onto stilts. However, my 6”4” tall husband had no problem whatsoever. It would be nice if the shovel came in different sizes: large, medium and small – or tall, mid-height, and short.

The handgrip is comfortably wide, accommodating large or small hands, and is made of reinforced rubber that is both durable and slip-proof.

foot step on Root Assassin shovel

The manufacturers claim the step is angled, but I didn’t notice that. However, I’m sure it didn’t matter one way or the other.

The manufacturers claim the step is forward turned for secure foot placement, but I couldn’t see it. To my eye it looked almost perfectly parallel to the ground if the shovel is held straight upright.

Specifications and Features

  • 20 Double edged sharp serrated teeth on each side
  • Commercial grade carbon steel 14-gauge blade
  • Forward turned-step for secure foot placement
  • Comfort D-grip, reinforced rubber handle for added leverage and control
  • Weighs 4 pounds
  • Retails for $59.99

Recommendation

5 Shovels Rating from Gardening Products ReviewOften hybrid tools end up doing neither job well. The Root Assassin is a happy exception. If you are digging a hole in a root-infested area, this is the perfect tool. While I would not pick up this tool simply to cut off a branch, if it’s in my hand when a branch for cutting presents itself, it will do the job effectively.

The Root Assassin Shovel lives up to its name, and to the claims made by the manufacturer. I highly recommend it.

The company can be reached online through their website www.Rootassassinshovel.com. The Root Assassin is a patented all-purpose garden shovel and saw.

Where to Buy

The Root Assassin shovel is available directly from the manufacturer or through Amazon. The retail price is $59.99 at either location, plus shipping.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/root-assassin-shovel-review/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway

+ Gardening Products Review

At the end of each year, the Gardening Products Review takes a close look at all of the products we’ve reviewed that year. We then award up to five products with the Golden Shovel Award for outstanding garden product.

In 2014, we had a lot a fabulous products to choose from, including some new introductions, as well as some that have been around the block a few times. Our reviewers weighed in with their favorites and we also heard from many of our readers. We revisited some of the products that we reviewed earlier in the year, checked how well products were holding up after extended use, and looked at which items got the most use from our testers and home gardeners.

After weighing the pros and cons of all of the gardening products, we’re proud to announce the 2014 winners of the Golden Shovel Awards!

2014 Golden Shovel Award Winners – Editor’s Choice

 

Review of Bear Wallow rose gauntlet glovesBear Wallow Gloves Rose Gauntlets – At first glance, these gauntlet-style gloves look like a pair of regular leather gardening gloves with a sleeve sewn on. Kind of a home-made look (which makes sense – they’re hand-made right here in the USA). But don’t let that fool you – these are hands down the absolute best pair of gardening gloves I’ve ever used for pruning roses..

 

HERShovel-featuredHERShovel Ergonomic Shovel for Women – HERS® is a hybrid tool that combines the features of both shovel and spade, designed with women’s bodies, height, and digging style in mind. Women will find that it offers lighter weight, improved leverage, and larger capacity than most shovels.

 

 

Root Assassin shovel reviewRoot Assassin Shovel – One look at the Root Assassin shovel’s saw-toothed blade, and you know this tool means business. Often hybrid tools end up doing neither job well but this easy-to-use shovel not only cuts easily through root-infested soil, it also prunes branches and sinks into turf easily.

 

 

Spear Head Spade reviewSpear Head Spade – This precision digging tool combines some of the best characteristics of a spade with a garden axe or knife. Lightweight yet sturdy, it makes quick work of a wide range of garden tasks. It is a great addition to the tool shed—but not a replacement for other shovels. What it does, it does much, much better than less specialized digging tools.

 

Review Source: http://gardeningproductsreview.com/2014-golden-shovel-awards-best-gardening-product/

Author Name: Monica Hemingway